#BIO2015

A global solution and removing barriers to antibiotic development are necessary to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Representatives from various research and health sectors discussed strategies for fighting superbugs at a BIO International Convention super session today. The panel agreed there must be a greater focus on streamlining clinical trials and harmonizing the global regulatory process to support the development of new antibiotics. Jim O'Neill, chairman, Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, recommended the establishment of a global $2 billion AMR Innovation Fund over five years funded by industry to help jump start product development. Venture capitalist risk could stimulate...
Astronaut Scott Kelly described the type of work underway on the International Space Station in a special satellite uplink at today's BIO International Convention luncheon. During a live interview, floating in zero-gravity, Kelly said they're working on 400 scientific projects on the station, and they hope to learn more about such things as bone loss and muscle wasting disease in space. With the latest technology, he said they're able to get plenty of data on human health performance and physiology, adding he hopes to learn "if there is a cliff out there in regards to our physiology as we go from six months to a year and longer." There are health related problems that can only be solved in...
"There's not one fix" to ensuring patient access to innovative medicine. That appeared to be the consensus of moderator Christi Shaw, president, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and panelists, discussing the opportunities and challenges in getting new therapies to patients with complex and chronic conditions like cancer, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis during a super session today at the BIO International Convention. Is the cost of some drugs a barrier? Are we adequately pricing the value of innovation? To ensure breakthroughs continue to reach patients, Scott Gottlieb, resident fellow, American Enterprise Institute, suggested that we need an approach to financing care that'...
Tom Brokaw says one of the motivating factors for writing his new book, A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope, was to help educate consumers about health care. "Most patients don't have a clue" about what they learn in doctors' offices and on the Internet, the former award-winning journalist noted today during his keynote luncheon remarks at the BIO International Convention. He said the country needs to have an informed debate on health care to address issues regarding affordability and access. Brokaw, who was diagnosed with multiple myeloma two years ago, said he was fortunate to receive quality health care, but many Americans do not have the same options. "We need big ideas" in...

Sidebar Quote

Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed.
Abraham Lincoln