biomedical research

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) is accepting nominations for the 2014 Lurie Prize in the Biomedical Sciences, an annual award recognizing outstanding achievement by a young scientist in biomedical research. The Prize? $100,000 , made possible by a generous gift from Ann Lurie, FNIH Board Member, distinguished philanthropist and president of the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Foundation. A few things to remember if you want to apply: the nominator must be a member of an accredited educational and/or scientific institution; the candidate must be 52 or younger on January 1, 2014; all nomination materials must be in English; and no self-nominations are allowed. The awardee...
The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) is accepting nominations for the 2014 Lurie Prize in the Biomedical Sciences, an annual award recognizing outstanding achievement by a young scientist in biomedical research. The Prize? $100,000 , made possible by a generous gift from Ann Lurie, FNIH Board Member, distinguished philanthropist and president of the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Foundation. A few things to remember if you want to apply: the nominator must be a member of an accredited educational and/or scientific institution; the candidate must be 52 or younger on January 1, 2014; all nomination materials must be in English; and no self-nominations are allowed. The awardee...
Promoting Basic Research in a New Age of Communications: Challenges and Opportunities REGISTER HERE . Scientists, journalists and policy makers. What do they all have in common? They all are trained (in very different ways) to ask the hard questions while serving the public interest. Often the lines of communications between these three professions are weak or, sometimes, non-existent. A greater understanding between them is needed to demonstrate the value and the return on investment of basic biomedical research. On October 9, 2013, join Research!America, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Elsevier, The George Washington University and the Society for Neuroscience for a workshop designed to...
Promoting Basic Research in a New Age of Communications: Challenges and Opportunities REGISTER HERE . Scientists, journalists and policy makers. What do they all have in common? They all are trained (in very different ways) to ask the hard questions while serving the public interest. Often the lines of communications between these three professions are weak or, sometimes, non-existent. A greater understanding between them is needed to demonstrate the value and the return on investment of basic biomedical research. On October 9, 2013, join Research!America, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Elsevier, The George Washington University and the Society for Neuroscience for a workshop designed to...
Op-ed by Abigail Schindler, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington , Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and co-leader of the Seattle Forum on Science Ethics and Policy published in The Seattle Times . When I think about not being a scientist anymore my heart hurts. But sadly, due to continued budget cuts to biomedical research, within the next few years that is most likely exactly what I will be ’€” no longer a scientist, no longer a researcher searching for cures for disease. And I am not alone. The number of young scientists being forced out of basic biomedical research in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate, and when this next generation of...
Op-ed by Abigail Schindler, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington , Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and co-leader of the Seattle Forum on Science Ethics and Policy published in The Seattle Times . When I think about not being a scientist anymore my heart hurts. But sadly, due to continued budget cuts to biomedical research, within the next few years that is most likely exactly what I will be ’€” no longer a scientist, no longer a researcher searching for cures for disease. And I am not alone. The number of young scientists being forced out of basic biomedical research in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate, and when this next generation of...
By William (Bill) R. Brinkley, Ph.D., TAMEST’€™s 2012 President Sometimes you find luck sitting by your side at the most opportune of moments. For example, what would you do if you suddenly found yourself seated next to a key member of the U.S. Congress on a two and a half hour flight to Washington, D.C.? Be prepared, it could happen to you! If you are a frequent traveler like me, you probably prefer to read, daydream or sleep on most flights. But what would you do if you suddenly recognized that your seat mate was a VIP’€”say, a key member of the U.S. Senate or House of Representatives? You might recognize it as a terrific opportunity to put in a good word for particular issues of great...
By William (Bill) R. Brinkley, Ph.D., TAMEST’€™s 2012 President Sometimes you find luck sitting by your side at the most opportune of moments. For example, what would you do if you suddenly found yourself seated next to a key member of the U.S. Congress on a two and a half hour flight to Washington, D.C.? Be prepared, it could happen to you! If you are a frequent traveler like me, you probably prefer to read, daydream or sleep on most flights. But what would you do if you suddenly recognized that your seat mate was a VIP’€”say, a key member of the U.S. Senate or House of Representatives? You might recognize it as a terrific opportunity to put in a good word for particular issues of great...
Alan I. Leshner, PhD In a recent op-ed published in the Toronto Star Dr. Alan Leshner, Research!America board member, writes that federal deficits in the United States and Canada ’€œpose a significant threat’€ to basic research. He notes that ’€œsome policy-makers seem to value near-term, industry-focused science more highly.’€ But adds that basic science has larger potential payoffs than applied research. ’€œThe most well-known example of life-changing basic research is of course Sir Alexander Fleming ’€™s accidental 1928 discovery of a mould (penicillin) that seemed to repel bacteria. German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen ’€™s 19th century efforts to pass cathode rays through glass now...
Dear Research Advocate: Yesterday, President Obama tweeted about the effects of sequestration on medical research. From @barackobama, “The #sequester is slowing the pace of medical research, delaying the discovery of cures and treatments. Read more .” It is terrific that the president is helping drive increased attention to medical research. Our thanks to him and also to all who have joined our Memorial Day recess week of social media advocacy . The American Heart Association posted this great image to its Facebook page; we also thank Society for Neuroscience , BIO , The Endocrine Society , Melanoma Research Alliance , University of Maryland School of Medicine , CURE Epilepsy and UPenn...

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Without continued support for health research, many of the most promising young scientists, their ideas and a myriad of potentially life-changing scientific breakthroughs will vanish into oblivion.
Paul Marinec, PhD; University of California San Francisco