cancer

A total of “1.7 million Americans will receive a new cancer diagnosis this year,” announced Frederick Ryan , President, and CEO of The Washington Post , in his opening remarks for the Post’s Chasing Cancer event earlier this month. Sponsored by Tesaro and the George Washington Cancer Center, the event did not shy away from difficult topic matter. Still, there were bright spots. “Why does cancer seem to work better in terms of novel therapeutic discoveries than other areas?” Asked new Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless . He believes it’s in part because researchers have a “good biologic understanding of the problem,” something that may be lacking when it comes to other conditions. The “...
As Research!America staff developed questions for our 2019 national public opinion survey, we reflected on the incredible progress in health and research in the 30 years since the organization was founded . We wanted to know: what did the American people think? Most Important Medical Achievements of the Last 30 Years What would you say was the single most important medical achievement of the past 30 years? (Choose one) Source: A Research!America poll of U.S. adults conducted in partnership with Zogby Analytics in January 2019 The list of options was carefully curated based on other published lists of medical breakthroughs, public health achievements, and retrospective articles looking back...
Dear Research Advocate: Speaking recently to the “New Voices” group at the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, as well as to young scientists during a visit to the University of Miami, I was energized by the passion, determination and commitment they all have for engaging the public. I discussed highlights of the survey findings we feature in Research!America’s new poll data summary A new survey question probes awareness and support for engagement of scientists in the policy making process. Other survey highlights include trend data that might surprise you — like the 10% increase since 2015 in those who say they would be willing to pay more in taxes if the money went to...
Dear Research Advocate: During his State of the Union address, when President Trump laid out the goal of ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the U.S., it brought to mind the critical role research has played in making eradication even plausible. Years and years of research and development in both the public and private sectors have yielded once-unimaginable diagnostics, treatments, prevention, strategies and public health surveillance tools. Relegating this scourge to the history books – in the U.S. and also worldwide – is a worthy goal indeed. The president highlighted our nation’s legacy of making “giant leaps of science and discovery.” As we noted in our statement , we can’t assume progress...
Dear Research Advocate: The government remains in a partial shutdown that began on December 22, taking a mounting toll on 800,000 federal workers, including those at FDA and NSF. The Alliance for a Stronger FDA has put together a “ Shutdown Toolkit ” detailing how this ongoing impasse is affecting us all. In a similar vein, the Coalition for National Science Funding has been sharing stories on social media that focus on how the shutdown is impacting NSF-funded research and programs, stifling discovery and sending a message of ‘no public confidence’ to aspiring young scientists. Clearly, the effects of the shutdown on research are multiple, disruptive and counterproductive. This New York...
Dear Research Advocate: After Tuesday’s election, we may or may not know the exact composition of the 116th Congress, as there are likely to be some very, very close races. But there is little doubt that the picture will be clearer than it is now when it comes to the policy dynamics next year -- and that is what our post-election briefing on Thursday, November 8 from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. EST at AAAS (1200 New York Ave, NW in Washington, DC) is all about. Register now! If history is any guide, the magnitude of change in Congress will affect the prospects for completing unfinished business during the lame-duck session of Congress; not surprisingly, the more turnover, the harder it is to build...
A tsunami of cancer threatens livelihoods across the globe, and the world is largely unprepared for its impact. The disease accounts for one out of every seven deaths worldwide – more than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined . Nearly 60% of the world’s cancer cases occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and these regions account for about 65% of the world’s cancer deaths . Reducing these disparities requires comprehensive and complementary approaches, and engaging with partners. The American Cancer Society’s global cancer control team has – through in-country research and collaborative partnerships – developed responsive and sustainable initiatives around cancer...
Dear Research Advocate: Americans spent $8.4 billion on Halloween in 2016 -- and no doubt will spend even more this year-- enough to fund the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) for 17+ years! What we spend to improve the quality of health care delivery represents only about 0.012% of the $3.3 trillion we spend on health care. Stats like these help place research -- in this case health services research (HSR) -- spending into perspective. (For more advocacy-relevant info, see our fact sheet .) The vision for AHRQ that Director Gopal Khanna shares in this terrific blog post underscores why a far greater investment in HSR makes strategic sense for our nation. More on what money...
This article is the sixth in a series highlighting the accomplishments of Research!America’s 2017 Advocacy Award honorees who will be saluted at a dinner in Washington, D.C., on March 15. More details can be found here . Nearly 1.7 million Americans were diagnosed with cancer last year. National expenditures for care are estimated to rise to $156 billion in 2020. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than half-a-million lives each year. Joseph R. Biden, Jr., 47 th Vice President of the United States, is leading efforts to accelerate the pace of cancer research through collaboration and innovative partnerships, and has been hailed as the driving...
This article is the fourth in a series highlighting the accomplishments of Research!America’s 2017 Advocacy Award honorees who will be saluted at a dinner in Washington, D.C., on March 15. More details can be found here . Nobel laureate Phillip A. Sharp, Ph.D., is Research!America’s recipient of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Award for Sustained National Leadership , which honors medical and health research advocacy leaders who have been instrumental in developing and implementing a sustained advocacy program for medical and health research. Prof. Sharp is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and serves as Chair of Stand Up To Cancer’s (SU2C) Scientific...

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The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient