cardiovascular disease

As we prepare to gather with family and friends around tables big and small, it’s time to ask the age old question: What are you thankful for this year? Many of us will mention we are thankful for our health, but chances are that few will express thanks for the scientific research and public health vigilance that play a pivotal role in health and health care. In 1918, a major flu pandemic took the lives of 675,000 Americans and 50 million people across the globe. Today, vaccination and medicines that reduce the effects of the flu have dramatically reduced its impact. Looking ahead, researchers are making progress toward a “universal” flu vaccine that crosses all strains of flu and provides...
As Research!America staff developed questions for our 2019 national public opinion survey, we reflected on the incredible progress in health and research in the 30 years since the organization was founded . We wanted to know: what did the American people think? Most Important Medical Achievements of the Last 30 Years What would you say was the single most important medical achievement of the past 30 years? (Choose one) Source: A Research!America poll of U.S. adults conducted in partnership with Zogby Analytics in January 2019 The list of options was carefully curated based on other published lists of medical breakthroughs, public health achievements, and retrospective articles looking back...
When was the last time you stopped to think about your heart? If you can’t remember, it’s probably because it’s been a while. Many of us try to follow a healthy diet and exercise, if time permits, but it’s difficult to make your heart a priority if you don’t know how. Only 55 percent of women actually know that heart disease is their number one killer. Too many women are not aware of the prevalence, risk factors, symptoms, and ability to control their heart health. In fact, a new study released in the journal Circulation on Feb. 20 underscores the gender differences in symptoms of heart attacks for women under 55. The misinterpretation of symptoms puts these younger women at a greater risk...
February is American Heart Month, a time dedicated to increasing awareness about ways to prevent, diagnose, treat and thrive with heart disease. On behalf of the 43 million women living with or at risk for heart disease, WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease urges Congress to increase support for research and access to high quality, affordable health care for all women. Research and access to care are critically important in the fight against heart disease, the leading cause of death for women. Evidence-based diagnostic techniques, treatments and rehabilitation services make it possible for patients to maintain a healthy and productive lifestyle, even after a heart...
Cardiovascular disease – including stroke – is the top killer of women, said Dr. Maria Duca of Virtua Health System Cardiology Group during a February 6 Women and Heart Health briefing organized by WomenHeart and the American Heart Association . “We are dying less in the last several years but we are still dying more than men,” Duca said. “It’s a women’s disease.” The briefing was one of many events that will take place nationwide in observance of American Heart Month in February. In particular, WomenHeart sought to educate women about their unique cardiovascular disease risk factors and provide them with the appropriate steps to take in addressing those factors. “Our mission is to empower...
As the Memorial Day Congressional recess ends, we wrap up our week of social media engagement with a strong message to our representatives: go back to Washington, DC and give us cures, not cuts! Medical and health research has already improved the quality of life for so many Americans. Thanks to cancer research we have better treatments for melanoma and cardiovascular research has yielded drugs and devices that have saved lives across the U.S. So many scientific developments are at risk without sustained federal funding. The need for research in neurological disorders like Alzheimer’€™s and multiple sclerosis is significant. Scientists agree that sequestration is already hampering disease...
A Presidential Proclamation in 1989 launched National Stroke Awareness month which is celebrated every May. Strokes occur when a blood vessel in the brain is clogged or bursts, preventing oxygen-rich blood from reaching an area of the brain. A number of factors can increase someone’€™s risk of stroke; including lifestyle choices that affect our cardiovascular health. But there are more complex factors including an individual’€™s genetic composition, age and gender. And risk factors for women can be different from those for men. You can learn more about these risk factors from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association . The National Institutes of Health’€™s National...
On September 29 th , World Heart Day , the global health community will raise awareness about cardiovascular disease (CVD). Cardiovascular diseases range from heart failure, meaning the heart is not pumping enough blood, to a heart attack, which happens when blood vessels are damaged and blood flow to the heart is blocked. An estimated 17.3 million people died from CVD in 2008 and over 80% of all CVD deaths occur in low and middle income countries. This year, we are also raising awareness of one of CVD’€™s ’€œhidden causes’€ : neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), and of the research necessary to combat these killers. A group of parasitic and bacterial infections that disproportionately...

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