Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

World Tuberculosis (TB) Day falls on March 24, 2018, and is an occasion in which to remember how far we have come in our fight against this preventable and curable infectious disease. A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that over the past 15 years, the number of TB deaths worldwide has fallen by 47 percent, which means that 50 million lives have been saved since 2000. The United States reported 9,093 cases of TB in 2017, which is the lowest number of cases on record. This low infection rate is due to the tireless efforts of local TB control programs that find and treat people with TB disease in order to stop the cycle of transmission. TB control also...
“Though we’ve been gloried in success, we still have unfinished business” when it comes to tackling cardiovascular disease, said NHLBI Director Dr. Gary Gibbons, highlighting the findings of a new American Heart Association-commissioned analysis at an event in Washington, D.C. last week. The report presented data on what lies ahead in cardiovascular disease prevalence and costs over the next few decades. Projections found more than 131 million people – or about 45 percent of the U.S. population – could suffer from cardiovascular disease by 2035, and annual costs related to this – both direct medical costs and lost productivity – could surpass $1 trillion; that’s more than all other chronic...
Dear Research Advocate: As we grieve the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the spectre of more to come is deeply troubling. If there were ever a time for action by our elected officials, surely this is it. Yesterday, Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) took to the Senate floor in a nearly 15 hour filibuster to demand action on gun reform, which ended in Republican leadership agreeing to a vote on two pieces of legislation related to gun sales. Senator Murphy was joined by many of his colleagues, including Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL), who said that the American Medical Association’s declaration of gun violence as a public health crisis is “historic,” entering their press release into the record...
April is National Minority Health Month. This year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are highlighting efforts to eliminate health disparities with the theme 30 Years of Advancing Health Equity, The Heckler Report: A force for Ending Disparities in America . Health disparity refers to a systematic difference in the health status of populations, often measured by mortality, disability, or morbidity, and caused by various personal, social, and environmental factors. The existence and challenges of health disparities among racial and ethnic groups in the United States were first acknowledged in the Heckler Report in 1985...
Dear Research Advocate: The short answer to what defense and public health have in common is that they are critical long-term investments for the nation. We have been hearing a lot of talk about funding increased investment in defense by taking it "off budget," and now former House Majority Leader, Eric Cantor, is calling for the same approach for investment in research. Cantor made the case today in the Huffington Post for increasing non-defense discretionary spending, specifically by increasing scientific and medical research, citing the “stimulative” economic power of innovation and basic research. Former Majority Leader Cantor’s call may resonate particularly strongly in the current...
This week, communities across the country are celebrating National Public Health Week . This annual observance recognizes the invaluable work public health professionals contribute to keeping our communities healthy and safe. It also reminds us of the importance of prevention in ensuring the health of our nation. We face a growing burden of chronic disease that is clearly unsustainable. Largely preventable conditions like heart disease, diabetes and stroke are taking too great a toll in lives and investments lost. We must reduce rates of disease and disability if we hope to create a healthier nation. Conducting research that promotes health and prevents disease is an important step in the...
As recent disease outbreaks have demonstrated, the need for public health is around the clock. But sequestration, across-the-board spending cuts, presents major challenges for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other federal health agencies. Among them: depleted resources for immunizations, reduced support to state and local health departments, and deep cuts to programs to prevent cancer, heart attacks, strokes, and diabetes. In spite of the challenges, public health professionals continue to dedicate their time and energy to addressing major health threats. CDC employees are among the many public health professionals who show tireless commitment to preventing disease...

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Luck shouldn't play a role in why I'm alive.
Laurie MacCaskill, a seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor