climate change

Dear Research Advocate, As we honor our military veterans today, it’s worth noting that medical research has been part of the Veterans Health Administration’s core mission from its conception in 1946 when $1 million was committed to focus on improving prosthetics for World War II veterans. Since then, federal investment in veterans health research has grown to well over $1 billion annually and the VA is a leader in neuroscience and healthcare delivery research, among its many important focus areas. Veterans — and all of us — are healthier thanks to VA-supported medical research. (If you missed it earlier this year, watch our conversation with Dr. Carolyn Clancy, Assistant Under Secretary...
Dear Research Advocate, This week, amidst the Delta-driven surge in the COVID-19 pandemic, the world watched the closing ceremonies of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. One of the most significant health stories to come out of the Olympics — at least for audiences watching in the U.S. — was how the athletes advanced the public discourse on mental health. 2016 Olympic medalist Laurie Hernandez played a prominent role in that important conversation, and we are thrilled to announce that she will speak on mental health awareness at our upcoming 2021 National Health Research Forum ! Also joining us are key federal officials, including Reps. Diana DeGette (D-CO) and Fred Upton (R-MI), White House...
Although climate change is often portrayed as a polarizing issue, it is a significant concern for Americans, according to a Research!America survey. Well over half of those surveyed said that climate change is already harming their own health, and similar numbers believe climate change is harming the health of others in their household, of Americans in general, and of people around the world. Two-thirds believe climate change will harm their own health “a great deal” or “a moderate amount” in the next 10 years, and only 14% said they believed climate change would not harm their health or the health of their household at all in the next 10 years. Multiple systems, including public health...
This year’s Public Health Thank You Day challenges us to answer the question: what is public health? The incredible diversity of specialties within the American Public Health Association’s membership leads me to ask that question on a daily basis. Our members shape fields as far ranging as child and maternal health, school health education, mental health, ethics, public health statistics and environmental health. But together, these disparate disciplines define public health. APHA is striving to create the healthiest nation in one generation, and despite different specialties and backgrounds each public health discipline and professional can be part of this movement. As schools improve,...
Dear Research Advocate, On Tuesday, I had the great honor of attending the bill signing for the 21st Century Cures Act (21stCC). It was particularly meaningful that this bill crossed the finish line during Vice President Biden’s tenure. His determination to deliver other families from the cancer tragedy experienced by his own lent a special strength to our collective efforts over a protracted period of congressional debate. If we continue to channel the Vice President’s level of commitment and determination, we can ensure that achieving faster medical progress remains at the forefront of national priorities. As you know (but it never hurts to reaffirm), it is important, but not sufficient,...
Consensus across numerous scientific studies shows that increased emissions of carbon dioxide contribute to the formation of ground level ozone and to increases in allergenic pollen production – both of which trigger asthma attacks and worsen allergic symptoms among the millions adults and children nationwide who are affected by asthma and/or seasonal allergic rhinitis. This mounting evidence demonstrates that the same changes that are contributing to changing the climate are affecting the health of people in the United States, especially those who have allergies or asthma. In collaboration with a research center at George Mason University, the national association of allergy doctors called...
On May 15, Research!America hosted a forum, ’€œNeglected Tropical Disease Research in Louisiana: Saving Lives and Creating Jobs.’€ The forum, featuring leading NTD experts from the region, was held at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans. Pierre Buekens, MD, PhD, dean of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, addresses forum attendees. Pierre Buekens, MD, PhD, dean of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, made opening remarks. He set the scene for the day, reminding us that there is a false divide between global and domestic health. Dr. Buekens pointed out that borders don’€™t matter when...
The devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy has prompted a renewed discussion about climate change. Political leaders and climate scientists alike have raised concerns about the relationship between global warming and an increase in the number of extreme weather events. In addition to these concerns, climate change may also increase the threat of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) here in the U.S. NTD transmission depends heavily on environmental conditions and warming temperatures may increase the severity or change the patterns of these diseases. For example, funded by a grant from the Department of Defense, researchers at Texas Tech determined that climate change will allow dengue to...

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor