clinical trials

In the development phase, scientists conduct translational research using clinical trials and other research paradigms to refine and apply the knowledge gained through basic research to develop lifesaving treatments. We hope the final Cures package modernizes clinical trials and increases participant diversity, encourages the development of new antibiotics, incentivizes research into treatments for rare diseases and diseases afflicting children, breaks down data silos, invests in regulatory science and incorporates patient perspectives into the research and regulatory process. Take action! Join our Twitter chat on Wednesday, August 10 at 1:00 pm EST with the Association of Clinical Research...
Nine years ago, Rebecca went to the emergency room with appendicitis-like pains. CT scans revealed that she had a tumor the size of a grapefruit sitting on her ovary. She was diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer, which has a five-year survival rate of 39 percent. “It was like a big baseball bat to the stomach when you find out you have cancer. The fear of the unknown is intense,” recalls Rebecca. “You think, is life over.” Finding a trial After receiving her diagnosis, Rebecca had surgery and chemotherapy, yet cancer cells remained in her body. Up to that point, Rebecca had heard of clinical trials but didn’t know much about them. Based on her doctor’s recommendation, she decided to...
By Israel Rocha, CEO, Doctors Hospital at Renaissance September 15 marks the beginning of Hispanic Heritage Month, a time to pay tribute to the generations of Hispanics who have enriched America’€™s history. It’€™s also an important time to consider how this community can be further empowered to make important contributions, particularly in the future of health care. Research demonstrates that certain diseases disproportionately impact the Hispanic community, including diabetes, liver cancer, cervical cancer and HIV/AIDS. Clinical trials help researchers find better ways to diagnose, prevent and treat these diseases and others. However, Hispanics are significantly underrepresented in...
Dear Research Advocate: My colleagues at Research!America have shared the role as author of our weekly letter during my recent sabbatical. My thanks to them for providing timely and actionable information to our wide network. As I am ’€œre-entering’€ the Washington space, I have been struck by (1) the significantly worse condition of the roads ’€” potholes everywhere, and now even sinkholes in DC! I’€™ve been in several global capitals this spring, including in less-developed countries, and DC doesn’€™t look good in comparison. Via recent domestic travels, I can attest to the poor condition of our roads nationwide, taking a toll on vehicles and our economy, while eroding public confidence...
Is the patient voice adequately represented in the drug development process? The situation has improved but the patient community is not yet recognized as a co-equal in drug development or regulatory review according to Marc Boutin, executive vice president and chief operating officer at the National Health Council , a panelist at a BIO International Convention session on Wednesday. ’€œWe scare you,’€ declares Boutin who says there is an adversarial connection between patients, regulators and industry but the relationship has evolved over the last decade. Patient advocates have developed strategies to amplify their voice and demand access, providing the data and evidence to help transform...
Letter to the editor by Research!America VP of Communications Suzanne Ffolkes published in The New York Times in response to article, ’€œ Labs Are Told to Start Including a Neglected Variable: Females ’€ (May 14, 2014) In addressing gender bias in biomedical and clinical research, it’€™s also important to close gaps in clinical trial participation among minorities to understand how different segments of the population respond to various treatments. When asked if they or someone in their family had ever participated in a trial, only 17 percent of Hispanics, 15 percent of African-Americans and 11 percent of Asian-Americans said yes in polling commissioned by Research!America, a nonprofit...
Excerpt of a blog post by Dr. Tom Insel, Director of the National Institute of Mental Health. (From NIMH blog) The Research!America awards dinner is like a lot of DC galas, complete with members of Congress, celebrities, and speeches to honor those who have contributed to a cause. For Research!America, the cause is biomedical research and this year, as in each of the past 25 years, there were honors bestowed on advocates for cancer and rare diseases. Kathy Giusti, diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 1998, spoke passionately about the lack of research on this blood cancer and her singular fight to create a registry and clinical trials, leading to new treatments that have extended her own life...
Dear Research Advocate: Fostering research and innovation has long been a multi-pronged effort ’€” government, industry, academia, patients and patient organizations, foundations, and individual philanthropists ’€” all working to advance research. The current interest shown by private philanthropists in advancing science is an echo of a phenomenon witnessed a century ago ’€” and a sign of the opportunity available in some way to all of us to accelerate medical progress and maintain our nation’€™s competitive edge. As reported in a recent front page New York Times article, private donors are stepping up in a big way at a time when scientific opportunity has never been greater. But it is...
Excerpt of an article by Research!America VP of Communications Suzanne Ffolkes and Communications Specialist Anna Briseno, published in Elsevier Connect . A panel hosted by Research!America and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network discusses challenges and opportunities for advancing cancer research Julie Fleshman’s journey to improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients was inspired by her father, who died four months after receiving the diagnosis. That was in 1999. Since then, she’s been advocating for research to support early diagnosis and better treatments. “That passion drives me every day ’€“ anger mixed with hope and optimism of the future,” she said. Fleshman , President and CEO...
Dear Research Advocate: What will determine the speed and scope of medical progress in the years to come? There is more to it than the essential ingredients of money and brainpower. Sound tax policy is essential if we are to propel medical progress. Yesterday, Rep. Dave Camp (R-MI-04), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, introduced a comprehensive tax reform bill. While the prospects for passage during this election year are ’€” to put a positive spin on it ’€” uncertain, Congressman Camp laid down the gauntlet for much-needed tax and entitlement reform, and he also proposed making the R&D tax credit permanent. Uncertainty surrounding future access to the R&D tax credit...

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We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America