genetics

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a jarring challenge to public health and economies worldwide. Even as we all navigate the crisis and its effect on personal health, professional lives and larger national strategies, I am heartened by the application of science in the public health response to the crisis, and inspired by the ways in which the genetics and genomics community is applying its knowledge and resources to play its part in addressing the pandemic. Time and again, health crises remind us of the importance of public funding for biomedical research, and the COVID-19 pandemic provides us with yet another example. Fundamental to combatting the virus is tracing its origin and understanding...
The January 2020 issue of Research!America's newsletter, The Research Advocate, is now online! In this issue: See the results of our latest survey conducted in partnership with members American Society for Human Genetics : Research!America-ASHG Survey Finds Americans Strongly Support Human Genetics Research . The survey finds the large majority of Americans agree genetic knowledge will be important to their own health and their families’ health. Americans also express great curiosity about genetics, as well as interest in what it tells us about human history and our common heritage as a species. Is the position of the U.S. in global science and engineering slipping ? Find out in the new...
Dear Research Advocate, There’s a lot going on right now, so this letter is a bit longer than usual. Stay with me! Let’s start with the Super Bowl. According to the National Retail Federation, this year’s Super Bowl-related spending is on track to be the highest ever: $17.2 billion. That’s enough to fund: NIH-sponsored research on chronic pain for more than 26 years. CDC’s National Center for Injury and Prevention Control for almost 27 years. The entire Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality budget , which plays a profoundly underappreciated role in driving better health and healthcare, for more than 38 years. This is a wealthy country; we don’t need to stop spending on all things Super...
The revolution in human genetics is advancing at an astonishing pace – new research applications, diagnostics, and effective treatments are changing the way we think about biology, medicine, and health. Last month, we celebrated the 15 th anniversary of the Human Genome Project’s (HGP) completion, which has powered so much of this progress. Today, we commemorate a different watershed achievement in genetics that has had profound public impact: 10 years of genetic nondiscrimination. On May 21, 2008, the United States codified fundamental protections for people participating in research or taking a genetic test in a doctor’s office to ensure it won’t affect their job or health insurance. The...
Let’s start with this: think of each person’s cancer as a unique locked door. Now imagine that with a simple test, we could find the right key to unlock that door and cure the cancer on the first try. This is the world of precision medicine, an emerging area of research that the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) feels is the mechanism for finally unlocking the cancer problem. So what does this mean for patients? Consider Mark Meerschaert’s experience. In a matter of weeks, Mark went from being an active on-the-go professor to someone who could barely walk; metastatic prostate cancer had come from nowhere and spread throughout his body. As a respected mathematics professor and researcher,...
Growing up in a rural community in upstate New York, I was not exposed to academic research at a young age. I knew I wanted to learn about diseases and the development of new treatments, even if I didn’t quite know exactly what that looked like at the time. A scholarship supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) made it possible for me to attend Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York where I studied biology and chemistry. The Ronald E. McNair Scholarship, a STEM program that provides under-represented populations with access to research, provided funding for my studies at the University of Rochester where I worked in the Gorbunova laboratory studying the obscure naked mole rats...

Sidebar Quote

You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter