George Washington University

Dear Research Advocate, I am pleased to repeat myself when I report that it’s been another science-heavy week on Capitol Hill...and most, but not all, of the news is good. This morning, the Energy and Commerce Committee passed (51-0, a tremendous bipartisan victory) the 21st Century Cures Act with new mandatory funding for FDA, and with the NIH Innovation fund intact...and both are paid for! Representatives Upton (R-MI-06) and DeGette (D-CO-01) kept their word and managed, in an extraordinarily tight fiscal environment, to negotiate viable supplemental funding for federal agencies pivotal to medical progress. I am not saying the bill is perfect, nor arguing that stakeholders should support...
Scientists go through rigorous training to learn skills necessary to perform quality research. We learn to properly create an experiment, analyze the data, and prepare it to be presented. Those data are often presented to other researchers who possess a similar knowledge base and technical lexicon. Unfortunately, little time and effort is devoted to teaching budding scientists how to deliver scientific messages to other audiences: a population larger than those within the academy. I was fortunate to attend a two-day workshop hosted by Research!America and George Washington University titled “Connecting the Dots: Effectively Communicating Science to Non-Scientists” on April 13 and 14. I...
I had the opportunity to attend Connecting the Dots: Effectively Communicating Science to Non-Scientists, which was a two-day conference at George Washington University hosted by Research!America. The Connecting the Dots workshop happened to coincide with a scheduled trip to Washington D.C. where I would be visiting the National Institutes of Health. I was keen to learn more about what Research!America is doing and hopefully hone some of my skills for interacting with non-scientists, particularly in light of the current state of funding, and the sometimes tenuous perceptions of science held by the public. The workshop pulled together a number of necessary competencies for having impactful...
Research!America and the Executive and Professional Education program at George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs (SMPA) co-hosted the two-day workshop, “Connecting the Dots: Effectively Communicating Science to non-scientists,” on April 13-14 at the Milken School of Public Health on the campus of George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Read the summary here and view the photos here .
By Benjamin Caballero MS, PhD Candidate, Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Although science is perceived to have a fundamental role in addressing major problems of modern society — from climate change to global healthcare — the persistent dwindling of its funding by government agencies is a global trend. It seems that the betterment of humankind is in jeopardy if this trend continues. But who is responsible for this? And more importantly, how can it be changed? During the ’€œResearch Matters Communications Workshop for Early Career Scientists’€ at the George Washington University (GW) on October 9 organized by Research!America, Elsevier...
By Benjamin Caballero MS, PhD Candidate, Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Although science is perceived to have a fundamental role in addressing major problems of modern society — from climate change to global healthcare — the persistent dwindling of its funding by government agencies is a global trend. It seems that the betterment of humankind is in jeopardy if this trend continues. But who is responsible for this? And more importantly, how can it be changed? During the ’€œResearch Matters Communications Workshop for Early Career Scientists’€ at the George Washington University (GW) on October 9 organized by Research!America, Elsevier...
Dear Research Advocate: Like most Americans, we are alarmed by the ongoing government shutdown. Since the shutdown began, I have been in Georgia, Massachusetts and Ohio, speaking to business and academic leaders, state and local elected officials, philanthropic leaders, and working scientists. Everyone is outraged! Clearly, biomedical and health research ’€” already compromised via sequestration ’€” is not the only priority placed at risk by the impasse, but it is a critical one. From limiting access to clinical trials to undermining the ability to protect our food supply or investigate disease outbreaks, Americans are put at unnecessary risk when government employees are furloughed. We...
Dear Research Advocate: Like most Americans, we are alarmed by the ongoing government shutdown. Since the shutdown began, I have been in Georgia, Massachusetts and Ohio, speaking to business and academic leaders, state and local elected officials, philanthropic leaders, and working scientists. Everyone is outraged! Clearly, biomedical and health research ’€” already compromised via sequestration ’€” is not the only priority placed at risk by the impasse, but it is a critical one. From limiting access to clinical trials to undermining the ability to protect our food supply or investigate disease outbreaks, Americans are put at unnecessary risk when government employees are furloughed. We...
Dear Research Advocate: Congress is on the brink of forcing a government shutdown on Tuesday, October 1. The implications of a shutdown are being subsumed by coverage of the political theater taking place. That is an injustice to Americans, who will be affected. History is illustrative on this point. During the 1995 and 1996 shutdowns , the NIH turned away new patients at the Clinical Center. Research studies housed at federal institutions ceased for the duration of the shutdown; researchers and leaders of industry, academia as well as in government agencies were unable to plan effectively, wasting time and money; the CDC was forced to stop disease surveillance programs, leaving us...
Dear Research Advocate: Congress is on the brink of forcing a government shutdown on Tuesday, October 1. The implications of a shutdown are being subsumed by coverage of the political theater taking place. That is an injustice to Americans, who will be affected. History is illustrative on this point. During the 1995 and 1996 shutdowns , the NIH turned away new patients at the Clinical Center. Research studies housed at federal institutions ceased for the duration of the shutdown; researchers and leaders of industry, academia as well as in government agencies were unable to plan effectively, wasting time and money; the CDC was forced to stop disease surveillance programs, leaving us...

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We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America