investment

The Research!America 2021 Virtual Advocacy Awards program featured recognition of several of the 2020 awardees we were unable to salute in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Herbert Pardes, Executive Vice Chairman of Board of Trustees, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, and Research!America board member, introduced the speakers and extended his thanks. “I want to thank you all for your respective contributions to science and health. We've never needed you more than now,” he said. Stephen Rosenfeld, MD, President, Freeport Research Systems, and President, Rosenfeld Heart Foundation, led these remarkable advocates, scientists, and researchers in a discussion intended to allow the audience...
According to results from a Zogby Analytics survey commissioned by Research!America in January 2021, a majority of Americans support research investment. More than 75% believe investing in research is important for achieving key priorities, from economic recovery and job creation to preventing and curing illnesses to maintaining global competitiveness. Three-quarters strongly or somewhat favor doubling federal spending on research over the next five years, and 6 in 10 say they would be willing to pay more in taxes if that money would be spent on medical research. Support for funding university research is high, with about 80% approval for federal and state funding of university research...
While the United States has been the uncontested leader in research & development (R&D) spending for decades, global trends in R&D investment pose a growing threat to U.S. leadership. The share of U.S. GDP devoted public R&D investment continues to shrink, threatening our ability to firmly stand on the cutting edge of scientific innovation. Nearly 90% of Americans say it is important for the U.S. to be a global leader in health and scientific research. Eight in 10 believe it is important for the U.S. to set and achieve a goal of spending 3%-5% of the GDP on research and development, as countries like Japan and Korea have done. Currently, the U.S. spends 0.7% of its GDP on...
Being in the middle of a global pandemic feels unsettling and frightening. Part of that fear is rooted in the unknown, because we still have many unanswered questions: fundamental information researchers don’t know about the coronavirus and how viruses like it will act in the future. At the moment, we’re rightly focused on urgent issues such as securing personal protective equipment and ventilators. But we need more research, because to win the battle we need to understand our enemy so that better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention will become a reality. As I wrote recently in USA Today , “Rarely in recent memory has it been this difficult to see beyond the next day. ... But that is...
Dear Research Advocate, A recent New Yorker cartoon speaks volumes. The scene is the local high school science fair, and the (captionless) image is of the winning entrant, surrounded by his (sic) disappointed brethren, who are scowling at the entrepreneur in their midst. The blue ribbon has been awarded to "How to Monetize Other Kids' Science Projects." Is our cultural obsession with entrepreneurism good news? Several contemporary news items, as well as thought pieces, raise aspects of this question. This is more than a little relevant to the future of science and what we want from science. It is now received wisdom that the economic value of science is responsible for half the growth of US...

Sidebar Quote

The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient