medical research

Tell Congress to Make it Permanent. The R&D tax credit, a proven engine of economic development, was created more than 30 years ago and spurs innovation by companies of every size across every sector. For medical research and development, the tax credit not only creates jobs, but it enables critical R&D focused on a host of disabling and deadly illnesses. However, as it stands, the tax credit needs to be reauthorized by Congress and the president every year. This creates uncertainty for businesses and hinders the full economic benefit of this incentive. Strengthening the tax credit by making it permanent is vital to continuing our nation’€™s commitment to research. The Senate...
Tell Congress to Make it Permanent. The R&D tax credit, a proven engine of economic development, was created more than 30 years ago and spurs innovation by companies of every size across every sector. For medical research and development, the tax credit not only creates jobs, but it enables critical R&D focused on a host of disabling and deadly illnesses. However, as it stands, the tax credit needs to be reauthorized by Congress and the president every year. This creates uncertainty for businesses and hinders the full economic benefit of this incentive. Strengthening the tax credit by making it permanent is vital to continuing our nation’€™s commitment to research. The Senate...
Dear Research Advocate: Our elected representatives know they must make hard tax and entitlement reform decisions, and, for the sake of the nation, ensure those decisions foster economic growth and societal progress. Part of that equation is federal funding for medical research sufficient to capitalize on unprecedented scientific opportunity and tackle urgent threats like Alzheimer’€™s Disease. As I’€™ve highlighted before, a majority of Americans say they are willing to pay additional taxes ’€” $1 more per week (which amounts to approximately $4.4 billion annually) ’€” if they knew those dollars were funding medical research. The public is on our side with their wallets as well as their...
Dear Research Advocate: Our elected representatives know they must make hard tax and entitlement reform decisions, and, for the sake of the nation, ensure those decisions foster economic growth and societal progress. Part of that equation is federal funding for medical research sufficient to capitalize on unprecedented scientific opportunity and tackle urgent threats like Alzheimer’€™s Disease. As I’€™ve highlighted before, a majority of Americans say they are willing to pay additional taxes ’€” $1 more per week (which amounts to approximately $4.4 billion annually) ’€” if they knew those dollars were funding medical research. The public is on our side with their wallets as well as their...
by Mary Woolley, Research!America President and CEO. This entry was originally posted as a guest contribution to PhRMA’€™s Conversations forum. A shift in attitude among elected officials is necessary if this nation is to succeed in combating disease and stemming the rise of health care costs. Federal funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other agencies that conduct medical and health research has not kept pace with scientific opportunity, jeopardizing our ability to find cures for deadly disease and to maintain our global competitive edge. Medical research has not risen to the upper ranks of our nation’€™s priorities in the halls...
by Mary Woolley, Research!America President and CEO. This entry was originally posted as a guest contribution to PhRMA’€™s Conversations forum. A shift in attitude among elected officials is necessary if this nation is to succeed in combating disease and stemming the rise of health care costs. Federal funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other agencies that conduct medical and health research has not kept pace with scientific opportunity, jeopardizing our ability to find cures for deadly disease and to maintain our global competitive edge. Medical research has not risen to the upper ranks of our nation’€™s priorities in the halls...
By Shaun O’€™Brien, co-president of the Penn Science Policy Group. O’€™Brien is a fifth-year immunology graduate student at the Perelman School of Medicine (a Research!America member). Shaun O’€™Brien In response to the need to voice the concerns of young biomedical graduates and post-docs over the federal funding climate, graduate student Mike Allegrezza founded the Science Policy Group at the University of Pennsylvania. Over the past 6 months, our group has been involved in advocacy efforts along with examining other specific issues pertaining to careers, graduate education and other hot-button issues. In terms of advocacy, the group has been very active in opposing sequestration, the...
July 9, 2013 The Senate subcommittee markup of the Labor-Health and Human Services-Education FY14 spending bill goes a step in the right direction in softening the blow sequestration has dealt to the hopes and expectations of patients and their families. Sequestration’€™s across-the-board spending cuts have sent no-confidence signals across the full ecosystem of medical research and innovation in the public and private sector. There’€™s a reason that, according to a recent national public opinion poll commissioned by Research!America, nearly half of Americans (48%) do not believe we are making enough progress in medical research in the U.S. This nation can’€™t push ahead forcefully with one...
U.S. Capitol As July 4 th approaches, we have another opportunity to contact elected officials via social media during the Congressional recess (July 1 ’€“ 5) to drive home the message that medical innovation should be protected from further cuts. Each day we will highlight a specific theme that can be customized with your statistics and patient/researcher stories. For example, on Wednesday we’€™ll focus on the drug discovery pipeline because basic research fuels private sector innovation which translates into new diagnostics, devices and products to improve the health of all Americans. Follow us on Twitter @ResearchAmerica and use the hashtag #curesnotcuts to join in the national...
We are reminded yet again why global health issues matter for Americans with recent news coverage of a possible tuberculosis outbreak at a Virginia high school that may have affected over 430 faculty and students. Health officials are recommending that all individuals at the school be tested for the disease. Tuberculosis bacteria Photo credit: CDC/ Dr. Ray Butler Historically, tuberculosis has been the world’€™s greatest infectious killer, taking an estimated billion lives over the past 200 years. Tuberculosis remains a global threat today ’€“ in 2011 alone, the disease sickened 8.7 million people. Even more alarming is the rise of drug-resistant forms of the disease. WHO estimates that...

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Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana