National Minority Health Month

Sickle cell disease affects approximately 100,000 Americans . It’s an inherited disorder where red blood cells contort into the shape of a sickle. These cells die early, leaving healthy red blood cells in short supply and intermittently blocking organ blood flow. If not diagnosed early and properly managed, the disease can lead to serious complications, including severe pain, infection and stroke, and significantly reduced life expectancy. The many complications of sickle cell disease can make every stage of life extremely difficult for individuals with the disease. Making matters worse, many people living with sickle cell disease are unable to access state of the art care. National...
Less than 20% of African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians in the U.S. say they or a family member have ever participated in clinical trials, according to a survey commissioned by Research!America. This lack of inclusion of minority patients can negatively impact the quality of care provided to these patients and ultimately contribute to health disparities. Oftentimes, much of the data supporting approval of new drugs in America is based on clinical trials in non-U.S. populations that poorly reflect American diversity. The lack of U.S. data is, in large part, due to the “difficulty” in recruiting American patients to clinical trials, and represents a barrier to precision medicine. Project...
April is National Minority Health Month. This year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are highlighting efforts to eliminate health disparities with the theme 30 Years of Advancing Health Equity, The Heckler Report: A force for Ending Disparities in America . Health disparity refers to a systematic difference in the health status of populations, often measured by mortality, disability, or morbidity, and caused by various personal, social, and environmental factors. The existence and challenges of health disparities among racial and ethnic groups in the United States were first acknowledged in the Heckler Report in 1985...

Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana