national science foundation

Research!America member FASEB (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) kicked off their NSF Matters campaign with a briefing highlighting NSF-funded research tackling antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotic-resistant infections, driven by overuse of antibiotics in clinical and agricultural settings, are on the rise, began the briefing’s first panelist, Dr. Paul Turner , Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University . His work focuses on a new, non-antibiotic approach to treating bacterial infections: viruses. Bacteriophages (simply referred to as phages) are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. The phage Turner works with attacks bacteria via their...
Dear Research Advocate: I’ve devoted part of my last two letters to gun violence research, and this one will address it, as well. It seems to me that we are witnessing in real time just why research is essential to addressing what is actually a long-standing and multi-faceted societal challenge, playing out on the streets every day, as well as in schools, concerts and churches. I’m sure all of us have read and heard assertions about what drives individuals to choose gun violence. What’s too often lacking, though, are research-based findings to back up those assertions. If policy changes are taken based on assumptions rather than evidence, we are simply throwing the dice, not identifying...
Dear Research Advocate, In a week with lots of mixed signals on health care, we released new survey data that shows a striking increase in public support for empowering patients (and we are all patients!) to participate in clinical trials. A strong majority say joining a clinical trial is as valuable as donating blood. And a new question shows the public would value providers discussing clinical trials as a routine part of health care. These findings come just as NIH’s “All of Us” initiative launches a new grant program to encourage enrollment in the ambitious one million-enrollee clinical research effort. Read more about our survey , and plan to attend our National Health Research Forum in...
Dear Research Advocate, House leaders will likely act soon after the July 4 recess to pass an FY18 budget resolution. No word on when the Senate might act. Reportedly, the House budget resolution would instruct appropriators to spend more on defense than in FY17, significantly more, in fact, than is allowed under the defense “sequestration cap” established by the 2011 Budget Control Act (BCA). In contrast, non-defense discretionary (NDD) spending would be limited to a level at least $5 billion below the NDD budget cap. This increase in defense and decrease in NDD spending is actually more “moderate” than the $54 billion reallocation proposed in the president’s budget. And neither the...
The recent presidential town hall debate didn’t even touch on the critical role science and research play in our nation’s health, security and prosperity. There is one more debate, October 19th, and with the topics already announced , now is the time to suggest questions to moderator Chris Wallace and his Fox producers by tweeting to @FoxNews and @FoxNewsSunday. The list of topics for the debate doesn’t include science in a direct way; however, the economy is on the list, presenting a clear opportunity to ask what each candidate would do to fuel research and innovation in the interest of creating good jobs and driving the economy. In a recent opinion piece , Bill Gates lays out how...
Dear Research Advocate: It's graduation season and a time to consider the opportunities - and challenges - facing young people, our workforce, our economy and our nation. The director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Dr. France A. Cordova challenged graduates at Rochester Institute of Technology ( video here ) to find the value in all experiences in life - even when the benefit might not be immediate - and to work with individuals from a wide variety of fields to address the grand challenges of our time. Her messages resonate as lessons learned from basic research, a venture rich in challenge, with gains not always clear at the outset, enhanced by collaborations across disciplines...
As 2015 comes to an end, let’s revisit the top ten most popular Research!America blog posts of the year (based on page views) that emphasized the importance of communicating the value of research and making research and innovation a higher national priority. We would like to thank our outstanding guest bloggers, including early career scientists, and leaders representing academia, industry, patient groups and scientific societies, who believe in the endless possibilities of scientific discovery, development and delivery to improve our nation’s health. 1) Lessons learned from a workshop on effective science communication April 24 : Our most popular post of the year! Debra Cooper, Ph.D., a...
Louisiana State University (LSU), a land-, sea-, and space-grant institution, is the only public Carnegie designated Research Extensive University in Louisiana. With more than 2,000 funded research projects underway at any given time, LSU has developed a research strategy centered on enhancing, expanding and positively impacting the intellectual enterprise, cultural resources, and economic activities in Louisiana, the nation and the world. LSU’s research focus areas include materials science and engineering, coastal sustainability and environment, conventional and renewable energy, high performance computing, biotechnology and biomedical research, communication and expression, and...
Dear Research Advocate: Washington isn’€™t ignoring research; far from it. Legislation was recently signed into law that allows appropriators to reallocate federal funding from the Republican and Democratic conventions to children’€™s health research; proposals have been introduced that could ultimately provide supplemental federal funding streams for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and several other health research programs; and some Members of Congress have once again launched an attack on the National Science Foundation, demonizing certain projects as a means of casting doubt on scientific freedom. Unless you’€™re playing...
Excerpt of an article published in The Huffington Post with first-hand accounts of how sequestration is impacting scientific research. When The Huffington Post published an in-depth look at how budget cuts were affecting scientific research, we encouraged readers to offer reactions and share personal experiences. Responses varied. There were some in the political world, primarily conservatives, who believed the issue was overblown. Funding for the National Institutes of Health, they noted , remained robust at $29 billion. And while the agency’s budget has decreased because of sequestration, it is still dramatically higher than it was under Bill Clinton, even when adjusted for inflation...

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