public health

Good health begins with people understanding the importance of prevention and lifestyle. In order to advocate for prevention in their communities, schools and cities, it is important for individuals to know how to keep themselves and others healthy through adequate diet and physical activity, by avoiding smoking, by drinking only in moderation, and by getting regular medical checkups. The idea that avoiding and preventing disease is a lot better than suffering with disease usually resonates well with the general public. However, prevention must connect behaviors now with what may be avoided later, and often needs to occur in the absence of illness or any similar motivation. For example,...
Dear Research Advocate, As we prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving, it is fitting to thank our public health workforce for their tireless efforts on our behalf every day of the year. Monday marked the official Public Health Thank You Day (PHTYD), but it is ongoing. This year’s effort has been extraordinary, with more than 50 organizations partnering with us to get the word out. For the first time since we launched PHTYD in 2005, Congress officially joined the effort. As I mentioned last week, the co-chairs of the House Public Health Caucus introduced a resolution supporting PHTYD. Online, more than 1,000 organizations and individuals participated, including federal officials from HHS and DOD,...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. Dr. Cicily Hampton currently serves as the Senior Director of Health Science & Policy at the Society for Public Health Education. As senior director, She leads SOPHE’s legislative and regulatory advocacy efforts to bring attention to public health, health disparities, and health education. Dr. Hampton received her Ph.D. in public policy from UNC Charlotte. In your opinion, what do you think are the most...
Dear Research Advocate: A very close election has entered the history books, in the process laying bare the profound divisions that will challenge all our elected representatives as they seek to unify and heal the nation. We have been deluged with questions about the impact of a Trump Administration on science. A useful primer is his answers to the ScienceDebate.org questionnaire that we and several other groups worked together to create. For example, President-elect Trump says this: “...the federal government should encourage innovation in the areas of space exploration and investment in research and development across the broad landscape of academia.” He also says this: “Though there are...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. “We can look back on the whole history of public health and see that environmental health is very at much the center of it,” said Tee Guidotti, M.D., MPH, president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Honor Society. “When public health was organized for the modern era in the 1850s, environmental health was one of the first areas to be codified into new public health acts, because that era was quite dangerous...
If you had an opportunity to include public health priorities in the next president’s inaugural or State of the Union address, what would they be? Building more healthier communities and increasing investments in public health research to understand the root causes of health challenges were among the recommendations of panelists at a town hall moderated by Research!America president and CEO Mary Woolley at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting on Monday, October 31. The presidential candidates are interested in improving our nation’s infrastructure but they’re not thinking about the health infrastructure, noted Julie Gerberding, M.D., MPH , executive vice president for...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. The U.S. is experiencing a shifting landscape of health care and public health. Access to care, quality of care, health care costs, medication adherence, and medication safety are top priorities to patients. Research has shown that, along with medication management, we can look to pharmacists to effectively provide preventive care and follow-up services, helping to address each of these priorities in easily...
The One Health Initiative , which is supported by scientific, health and environmentally related disciplines, represents the future of infectious disease treatment and prevention. As advocates for science and medical innovation, we must recognize the enormous potential that One Health holds and encourage multi-disciplinary thinking and collaboration across the full spectrum of stakeholders to improve public health and security. Many zoonotic diseases -- diseases that are transmissible between animals and humans -- have had profound effects on public health. Ongoing scientific research on a West Nile Virus vaccine, increased understanding of chronic Lyme disease and therapeutic treatments...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. While One Health or One Medicine is a relatively new idea, humans have long recognized the connection between animals, humans, the environment and health. Chinese scholars in the last three centuries BCE interpreted the earth and human body as interdependent and that if the land was unhealthy so was the body. Writings from the Hippocratic Corpus (composed between the sixth and fourth century BCE) include...
Recent research suggests that oral health is closely tied to overall physical health, and poor oral health could play a role in a wide range of diseases like diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. As such, it is becoming clear that obtaining good oral healthcare services is just as important as getting quality medical care. However, 1 in 5 Americans 65 and older have untreated cavities, and over 70% have periodontal disease. Research!America and Colgate-Palmolive hosted a Capitol Hill briefing on Tuesday, October 4 in Washington, D.C. to discuss oral health challenges facing older adults in the United States featuring top experts in the fields of public health and dentistry. Dr. Michael...

Pages

Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana