research

Patient advocate Rebecca Black suffered for nearly a decade, undergoing numerous surgeries and dozens of doctor visits, before being accurately diagnosed with endometriosis. Black is not alone. Nearly three-fourths of women with endometriosis experience a misdiagnosis, and it can take almost seven years on average for a woman to be accurately diagnosed. Speakers representing academia, providers and patients discussed ways to address the often-debilitating condition during the Society for Women’s Health Research’s April 10 panel discussion in Washington, D.C. Endometriosis, abnormal tissue growth outside the uterus, can lead to severe pain and infertility. Despite the fact that it affects at...
Mental health in this country is not getting the attention it deserves, says Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX-30). During Research!America’s 29th Annual Meeting of Members on March 14 in Washington, D.C., Rep. Johnson stressed the importance of early intervention and “assertive community treatment” to successfully address mental illness nationwide. “Each time we see massive incidents, we get concerned about [mental illness] again,” Rep. Johnson said. “But without those massive incidents, we still have the problem and don’t want it to be manifested in that fashion before we give it attention.” She was the keynote speaker at the annual meeting. Following Rep. Johnson’s remarks, a...
Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX-30) will be the keynote speaker at Research!America’s 29 th Annual Meeting of Members on March 14 from noon to 2 p.m. ET at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, D.C. The annual meeting will include election of directors, reports from leadership and a panel discussion about mental health. Rep. Johnson, Ranking Member of the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology and a member of the Congressional Mental Health Caucus, will share insights from Capitol Hill on issues relevant to our nation’s scientific enterprise. Experts from across the mental health and neuroscience research continuum will participate in a panel discussion...
On February 12–13, the Alliance for Headache Disorders Advocacy organized the 11 th annual edition of the “Headache on the Hill.” This is a unique opportunity for patients and their families, headache providers and scientists to interact with legislators and advocate for pressing issues in the field. The single most important problem to address has been identified, and solutions for it have been proposed under a bipartisan bill introduced in both the Senate and House of Representatives as the Opioids and Stop Pain Initiative Act (S.2260/H.R. 4733). The annual societal cost of the pain and opioid crisis has been estimated at $1.1 trillion per year, making it the most costly U.S. health...
February is Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and Low Vision Awareness Month. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and the developed world, as well as of low vision, which means that even with glasses, contact lenses, medicine, or surgery, people find everyday tasks difficult to perform. AMD destroys vision through proliferation of new blood vessels (“wet” or neovascular AMD, reflecting about 10% of cases) or where photoreceptors (light-sensitive cells in the retina) die away (“dry” or atrophic AMD, accounting for 90% of cases). Since AMD affects the central part of the retina—called the macula—the resulting vision loss makes it increasingly difficult for an...
A tsunami of cancer threatens livelihoods across the globe, and the world is largely unprepared for its impact. The disease accounts for one out of every seven deaths worldwide – more than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined . Nearly 60% of the world’s cancer cases occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and these regions account for about 65% of the world’s cancer deaths . Reducing these disparities requires comprehensive and complementary approaches, and engaging with partners. The American Cancer Society’s global cancer control team has – through in-country research and collaborative partnerships – developed responsive and sustainable initiatives around cancer...
To Americans, there are few things more terrifying than going blind . Glaucoma is a particularly scary vision-stealing disease because without screening it offers no warning to those it strikes, causing significant, irreversible vision loss before a patient notices something is wrong. But in January, in honor of Glaucoma Awareness Month, the vision-research community reflects on the past year’s progress toward managing this challenging disease. As with all diseases, progress is dependent on research. First, it looks into understanding what causes the condition, and then into therapies that prevent, treat or cure it. Glaucoma research, spanning decades, has successfully identified what...
Research!America’s webinars in 2017 tackled a variety of timely health and policy issues, such as the nation’s opioid crisis which accounts for six out of 10 drug overdose deaths, the vital role of federally supported global health research, and the importance of effective communication in educating the public and lawmakers about the far-reaching benefits of public and private sector research. Scientists, students, advocates, influencers, decision-makers and media participated in the webinars, which provided relevant and detailed information to raise awareness and inform advocacy initiatives. On December 4, Research!America and the Society for Neuroscience hosted the webinar “Leveraging...
Research into the development of Ebola vaccines, efforts to address opioid use among women, infectious diseases and a record number of novel drug approvals are among the many examples of federal health agencies making tremendous strides in 2017 to address complex and deadly health threats. The agencies highlighted their achievements in year-end articles, videos and reports on their websites. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) described progress with two Ebola vaccines and a bionic pancreas to better treat type 1 diabetes in addition to other clinical advances. The NIH also supported the work of three recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine and one recipient of the Nobel...
Our nation’s health has improved in some areas but serious health challenges remain related to the escalating drug crisis and disparities in access to care. United Health Foundation’s 2017 America’s Health Rankings report indicates smoking prevalence, the rate of preventable hospitalizations and the percentage of uninsured Americans have declined, but the drug death rate has trended upward. In the past year, drug deaths reached the highest level recorded by America’s Health Rankings , increasing by 7%, particularly among whites. Even states that consistently rank among the healthiest in the nation saw increased mortality rates due to the drug epidemic. Over the past five years, drug death...

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You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter