research

This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday November 23, 2015. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit http://www.publichealththankyouday.org (link is external) for more information. In the United States, injuries kill more people between the ages of 1 and 44 than any other disease. To put this in perspective, each day 480 people die from injuries, one person every 3 minutes. This is the equivalent of a Boeing 777 crashing each day. Of course not everyone who is injured dies. Millions of people are hospitalized or treated in emergency departments. All of this...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday November 23, 2015. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit http://www.publichealththankyouday.org (link is external) for more information. Dr. Carrie Bearden, clinical neuroscientist at UCLA seeks to understand the underlying biology of mood disorders in teens The rate of mood disorders nearly doubles when children enter adolescence. Dr. Carrie Bearden, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Psychology at UCLA, seeks to understand why. She uses interdisciplinary approaches to examine the role of circadian...
This article appeared on October 1, 2015 in The Huffington Post. “What are those things about breast cancer that keep you up at night?” It’s a question I’m asked frequently in my role as president and CEO of the largest breast cancer organization. And to be honest, there are many things. Among them is a misconception I sometimes hear that because breast cancer still kills, we’ve made no progress over the past three decades. And, because we have so more to do in breast cancer, what science, medicine, technology and a large and dedicated breast cancer community have already accomplished means little. But ask any patient who has another year of life thanks to therapies like Tamoxifen,...
Dear Research Advocate, It was down to the wire, but Congress passed and the President signed a continuing resolution (CR) yesterday evening to keep the government operating, at least through December 11, 2015. Speaker Boehner’s sudden resignation last Friday came as a shock. But since he has made it clear there is still a lot he’d like to accomplish before he leaves Congress on October 30, hopes have soared in many quarters! He is reportedly working with Leader Pelosi (D-CA-12), Senate leadership and the White House on a longer term budget deal, one that we hope will jettison sequestration. Now is a good time to thank members of Congress for taking action to prevent a shutdown, and urge...
Dear Research Advocate, A refreshing number of members of Congress have allocated time during this recess to champion medical research, among them Senators Capito (R-WV), Franken (D-MN), and Kirk (R-IL), and Representatives Burgess (R-TX-26), Dold (R-IL-10), Israel (D-NY-03), Lance (R-NJ-07) and Walden (R-OR-02). Rep. Dold, for example, visited Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as well as private industries in his district, like Marathon, to discuss ways to speed up medical innovation. Visiting the genetics lab at Northwestern, Rep. Dold commented: “We spent a little over 330 billion dollars this year in treating diabetes alone. Can we get some [additional] research...
This op-ed appeared online on Roll Call July 31, 2015. New technology such as CRISPR-Cas9, a genuine scientific breakthrough, is raising hope for patients with cancer, cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell anemia and other major health threats. The gene editing tool, used in precision medicine, allows changes to be introduced into the DNA of any living cell— potentially enabling repair of disease causing mutations, neutralization of disease carrying insects, and much more. This technology, developed with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF), is an example of the realization of the promise of innovative research funded by our federal science...
"There's not one fix" to ensuring patient access to innovative medicine. That appeared to be the consensus of moderator Christi Shaw, president, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and panelists, discussing the opportunities and challenges in getting new therapies to patients with complex and chronic conditions like cancer, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis during a super session today at the BIO International Convention. Is the cost of some drugs a barrier? Are we adequately pricing the value of innovation? To ensure breakthroughs continue to reach patients, Scott Gottlieb, resident fellow, American Enterprise Institute, suggested that we need an approach to financing care that'...
Research organizations are about as diverse as the scientists, clinicians and engineers they support. With that diversity comes differing strengths: at academic health centers, physicians and scientists work side-by-side to bring new laboratory discoveries to the care of patients, to educate and train future health professionals and to serve their local communities. Government laboratory investigators, on the other hand, assemble teams from multiple disciplines to work towards a handful of goals, build large and one-of-a-kind scientific instruments, and connect through a national network in the federal system. Here in the Pacific Northwest, our two research organizations – a public health...
As many as one-half of all cancers are preventable based on what we already understand. Despite many promising and innovative new therapies, cancer prevention remains “Plan A,” our first and best hope to reduce the burden of this disease. I recently shared key points of this plan, described below, in a June 1, 2015 lecture at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. At The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center , we established the cancer prevention and control platform within the Moon Shots program. Our mission is to develop and implement evidence-based actions in cancer prevention, screening, early detection and survivorship in clinical and community settings to...
Dear Research Advocate: That so many well-informed patient advocates are working for House passage of the 21st Century Cures bill (H.R. 6) is an excellent indication of just how important this legislation is to all of us looking for answers to what (literally) ails us. This makes it all the more puzzling that there aren’t more supporters weighing in from the science community. It may be because many don’t know about the bill yet -- a preliminary report from a poll of scientists we have in the field right now shows that only one in 5 members of the science community say they have heard of the bill. If you are a researcher and a regular reader of this letter, I know you know about it! Will...

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Without research, there is no hope.
The Honorable Paul G. Rogers