sequestration

Dear Research Advocate: Last week, I wrote about the international trade deficit our country faces. This week, I’€™d like to focus on the budget deficit. From 2003 to 2011, Medicare and Medicaid spending grew 74% while our economy only grew 35%. With that kind of differential, no government can balance its budget. We need research to address disabling and costly illnesses, but that won’t be enough in and of itself to bridge the gap. We also need tax and entitlement reform that preserves needed services, squeezes out waste and inefficiency (by the way, that’€™s why we must also fight to protect health economics research, health services research and other research that optimizes health care...
Dear Research Advocate: Last week, I wrote about the international trade deficit our country faces. This week, I’€™d like to focus on the budget deficit. From 2003 to 2011, Medicare and Medicaid spending grew 74% while our economy only grew 35%. With that kind of differential, no government can balance its budget. We need research to address disabling and costly illnesses, but that won’t be enough in and of itself to bridge the gap. We also need tax and entitlement reform that preserves needed services, squeezes out waste and inefficiency (by the way, that’€™s why we must also fight to protect health economics research, health services research and other research that optimizes health care...
Excerpt of an article published in The Huffington Post with first-hand accounts of how sequestration is impacting scientific research. When The Huffington Post published an in-depth look at how budget cuts were affecting scientific research, we encouraged readers to offer reactions and share personal experiences. Responses varied. There were some in the political world, primarily conservatives, who believed the issue was overblown. Funding for the National Institutes of Health, they noted , remained robust at $29 billion. And while the agency’s budget has decreased because of sequestration, it is still dramatically higher than it was under Bill Clinton, even when adjusted for inflation...
By Endocrine Society President Teresa K. Woodruff, PhD The sad stories flow in each day. A post-doctoral fellow gives up scientific research after 10 years of training. A cancer researcher faces a fruitless job search and expiring visa. The endocrinologist agonizes over letting a long-time lab employee go. Hundreds of these tales are unfolding across the country as the National Institutes of Health struggles to stretch its dwindling budget. Because of sequestration, an NIH budget that barely kept pace with inflation through the 1990s and early 2000s was slashed by another $1.6 billion this fiscal year. If Congress cannot agree on a more balanced approach to budget cuts, another $6.7 billion...
Excerpt of an article published in The Huffington Post with first-hand accounts of how sequestration is impacting scientific research. When The Huffington Post published an in-depth look at how budget cuts were affecting scientific research, we encouraged readers to offer reactions and share personal experiences. Responses varied. There were some in the political world, primarily conservatives, who believed the issue was overblown. Funding for the National Institutes of Health, they noted , remained robust at $29 billion. And while the agency’s budget has decreased because of sequestration, it is still dramatically higher than it was under Bill Clinton, even when adjusted for inflation...
By Endocrine Society President Teresa K. Woodruff, PhD The sad stories flow in each day. A post-doctoral fellow gives up scientific research after 10 years of training. A cancer researcher faces a fruitless job search and expiring visa. The endocrinologist agonizes over letting a long-time lab employee go. Hundreds of these tales are unfolding across the country as the National Institutes of Health struggles to stretch its dwindling budget. Because of sequestration, an NIH budget that barely kept pace with inflation through the 1990s and early 2000s was slashed by another $1.6 billion this fiscal year. If Congress cannot agree on a more balanced approach to budget cuts, another $6.7 billion...
Excerpt of an article published by The Salt Lake Tribune on sequestration’€™s impact to research institutions in Utah. Paul Fraughton | The Salt Lake Tribune Carl Thummel was about $200,000 short. The University of Utah professor of human genetics had already won the money, about one-third of his lab’€™s annual budget, from the National Institutes of Health. It was due to begin paying out in December ’€” just as the country went off the so-called fiscal cliff. More than six months later, the money still hadn’€™t come, the victim of federal budget cuts known as sequestration. So he cut his own salary by 25 percent, as well as his technicians’€™ pay. “They’€™re putting their salaries on the...
Excerpt of an op-ed by columnist George F. Will, published in The Washington Post. ’€œThe capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music.’€ ’€” Lewis Thomas The pedigree of human beings, Thomas wrote, probably traces to a single cell fertilized by a lightning bolt as the Earth was cooling. Fortunately, genetic ’€œmistakes’€ ’€” mutations ’€” eventually made us. But they also have made illnesses. Almost all diseases arise from some combination of environmental exposures and genetic blunders in the working of DNA. Breast cancer is a family of genetic mutations. The great secret of...
Excerpt of an article published by The Salt Lake Tribune on sequestration’€™s impact to research institutions in Utah. Paul Fraughton | The Salt Lake Tribune Carl Thummel was about $200,000 short. The University of Utah professor of human genetics had already won the money, about one-third of his lab’€™s annual budget, from the National Institutes of Health. It was due to begin paying out in December ’€” just as the country went off the so-called fiscal cliff. More than six months later, the money still hadn’€™t come, the victim of federal budget cuts known as sequestration. So he cut his own salary by 25 percent, as well as his technicians’€™ pay. “They’€™re putting their salaries on the...
Excerpt of an op-ed by columnist George F. Will, published in The Washington Post. ’€œThe capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music.’€ ’€” Lewis Thomas The pedigree of human beings, Thomas wrote, probably traces to a single cell fertilized by a lightning bolt as the Earth was cooling. Fortunately, genetic ’€œmistakes’€ ’€” mutations ’€” eventually made us. But they also have made illnesses. Almost all diseases arise from some combination of environmental exposures and genetic blunders in the working of DNA. Breast cancer is a family of genetic mutations. The great secret of...

Pages