STEM

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is in the process of creating a national call to action to improve science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education and is seeking public stakeholder feedback. According to the results of a recently-commissioned public opinion survey, a strong majority of Americans believe it is important to give higher priority to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. When asked whether they agreed or disagreed that the federal government should assign higher priority to improving STEM education, 84% said they strongly or somewhat agreed. This number is up from 69% in January 2017, possibly indicating a rising...
On March 26, a national day to speak out against AAPI hate, Research!America stands strongly with the Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community to #StopAsianHate. Racism and violence have no place in our society. This is, once again, a time for us all to recommit to community. It’s also a time for listening and reflecting. See the resources below from Carnegie Mellon, University of Pittsburgh, and San Francisco State for ways to get involved. Resources Collaboratory Against Hate - Research and Action Center - Led by Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh the center will bring together the collective expertise to better understand and combat hatred based on...
In a fast-paced, ever-changing biomedical and political landscape, it is more important than ever for biomedical researchers to communicate effectively with policymakers. Recognizing the importance of equipping students with science communication tools, Michigan State University’s Science Communication group, MSU SciComm, a 2019-2020 Research!America microgrant recipient, has developed Conveyance, a virtual conference to connect students with science communication leaders taking place March 20-21, 2021. During Conveyance, attendees can participate in sessions on topics like science policy, literature, art, and outreach. Science artists Dr. Semarhy Quiñones and Kelly Stanford will guide...
The confluence of the coronavirus pandemic with the racism pandemic is profoundly disturbing. This is a time for us all to recommit to community. It’s also a time for listening and reflecting. #ShutDownSTEM is a grassroots movement that aims to “transition to a lifelong commitment of actions to eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM.” Consider taking time to learn more about these issues by using the resources listed below as well as those suggested by #ShutDownSTEM . Statements from Alliance Members American Association For The Advancement of Science CEO Sudip Parikh’s Statement on #ShutDownSTEM and Black Lives Matter American Association for Dental Research Statement on Equity...
How does a biomedical sciences student with interests in clinical research go on to intern in the United States Senate? Like many other students, my undergraduate career followed a traditional path toward higher education. I kept my grades up, participated in extracurriculars, and was involved in a few clubs on campus. However, thanks to friends, mentors and the internet, it was clear that a career in STEM presented an immense number of other amazing opportunities. Looking into these opportunities, research quickly grabbed my attention. A professor was the first to introduce me to research and he motivated me to explore summer research opportunities. Looking back, I am grateful he did,...
Dear Research Advocate: Today the House and Senate passed a short-term continuing resolution (CR) to flat-fund the government through December 22. Congressional leaders hope this stop-gap will buy them enough time to negotiate a bipartisan budget deal that raises the Defense and non-Defense (NDD) spending caps. If the budget deal (#RaisetheCaps) is finalized by the 22nd, Congress may well pass yet another short-term CR to allow a month or two to complete an FY18 omnibus spending bill based on the new, higher funding levels. Continued momentum behind a budget deal is definitely good news, but momentum can wane; here is a new resource, culled from our state-by-state fact sheet series, that...
Dear Research Advocate, I was honored to speak yesterday to a group of early-career global health researchers, plus alums and mentors, gathered for orientation and training under the auspices of NIH’s Fogarty International Center. Following my prepared remarks we had a terrific informal discussion. A question from a researcher who had grown up in Kentucky triggered a thoughtful exchange: “how do I explain the value of my work to a resident of rural Kentucky, including why her taxes should pay for it?” These two linked but separate questions can seem quite daunting if, like most researchers, you have never been oriented, much less trained, to consider the public context of research. We’re...
Growing up in a rural community in upstate New York, I was not exposed to academic research at a young age. I knew I wanted to learn about diseases and the development of new treatments, even if I didn’t quite know exactly what that looked like at the time. A scholarship supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) made it possible for me to attend Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York where I studied biology and chemistry. The Ronald E. McNair Scholarship, a STEM program that provides under-represented populations with access to research, provided funding for my studies at the University of Rochester where I worked in the Gorbunova laboratory studying the obscure naked mole rats...
Hillary Clinton has been clear about her support for vaccines, but Donald Trump appears to be revising his views on immunizations. While supporting vaccination laws established by the states, Gary Johnson thinks the federal government should be allowed to intervene if there is a national or regional health concern. Jill Stein is concerned about declining vaccinations rates and has a plan to reverse it. The presidential candidates’ thoughts on vaccinations and 19 other science-related questions were released last Tuesday by ScienceDebate.org. Trump suggested a year ago at a GOP debate there’s a link between vaccinations and autism, giving an example of a 2 ½ year old child who developed a...
Transforming the current disease-specific non-profit funding model and the outlook for FY16 budget levels for research were among the topics addressed by Alex Silver, chairman and co-founder of EB Research Partnership and Representative Chris Van Hollen (MD-08) at Research!America’s Annual Members meeting held at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. on March 11. Silver became an advocate for research after learning that his son Jackson, who is now seven years old, was diagnosed with a severe form of Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB), a debilitating and potentially deadly genetic condition that causes internal and external blisters all over the body causing constant pain. In addition to...

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor