vaccine

Mary Woolley, President and CEO of Research!America, opened the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) annual meeting by leading a conversation on “Combating Anti-Science Thinking” with Georges C. Benjamin, MD , Executive Director of the American Public Health Association, and Bruce Gellin, MD , Chief of Global Public Health Strategy at the Rockefeller Foundation. The panelists addressed disturbing trends in anti-science thinking; the prevalence of misinformation and disinformation; and ongoing efforts within their organizations to address science skepticism, with emphasis on vaccine hesitancy. Here are a few highlights from their discussion, but you can also watch the entire...
The Research!America 2021 Virtual Advocacy Awards program featured a discussion with the co-recipients of the 2021 Building the Foundation Award: Katalin Karikó, PhD , of BioNTech and Drew Weissman, MD, PhD , of the University of Pennsylvania. Pfizer’s Mikael Dolsten, MD, PhD , introduced the recipients, then Research!America Board Member Victor Dzau, MD , President of the National Academy of Medicine, kicked off a discussion with the two collaborators whose work led to the use of messenger RNA (mRNA) in the development of key COVID-19 vaccines. Dr. Dzau expressed his sincere appreciation: “You know, your research is remarkable, it really changed the world and saved millions of lives. And I...
Americans across much of the U.S. might feel as if they are finally waking from a bad dream. COVID-19 cases are at their lowest levels since March 2020, vaccines are widely available, workplaces are reopening, social life has resumed, and domestic travel neared an all-time high over the July 4 holiday weekend. This “return to normal” is far from the case in many areas: countries from India to the United Kingdom to Argentina have experienced recent spikes in COVID-19 cases, with sometimes devastating results. First in India and then in the U.K., spikes in infection rates resulting in new lockdown restrictions were driven by the Delta variant – a mutation of the original SARS-CoV-2 virus. The...
Dear Research Advocate, A New Budget Proposal : President Biden’s full FY22 budget request builds upon and modifies parts of the initial budget blueprint he released in April. Research!America applauded the President in our statement . NIH, CDC, AHRQ, FDA, and NSF would all receive significant increases to their base budgets under the President’s proposal. In a particularly welcome development, the President now recommends a base budget increase of $2.5 billion for NIH (exclusive of ARPA-H). See our updated budget chart here . Use this editable Tweet to thank the President for proposing a number of crucially important increases. Look for opportunities in upcoming letters to help ensure...
A recent Research!America blog post discussed the issue of vaccine hesitancy as an obstacle to ensuring that enough U.S. residents receive a COVID-19 vaccine. However, vaccine hesitancy is far from the only barrier to achieving equitable vaccine distribution. Although recent surveys show that historically mistreated groups are somewhat less willing to take the vaccine, a majority of Americans across all racial and ethnic groups say they would take the vaccine if it were available to them today. In spite of this, white Americans are being vaccinated at far higher rates than Americans in other racial groups – rates that reflect more than just vaccine hesitancy. According to the most recent...
This is part one in a series of blog posts exploring COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, other barriers to immunization, and possible solutions. As the COVID-19 vaccine rolls out across the U.S., one question on everyone’s mind is, “when do things go back to normal?” The answer depends largely on when most Americans will be vaccinated. And vaccine uptake depends on how confident people feel about receiving the vaccine. With a thorough-but-swift scientific review process, and rampant misinformation, many people are hesitant to accept a COVID-19 vaccine. Experts estimate that 70-90% of Americans will need to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before it is possible to return safely to normal activities...
The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on the United States and the world, with extraordinary human tragedy and economic disruption. Since March 2, 2020, nearly 400,000 people in the United States have died of COVID-19 and more than 21 million cases have been identified. Over the next month, an estimated 820,000 to two million new cases are projected in the U.S. As COVID-19 cases continue to surge, the FDA’s authorization of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines is a critical step towards immobilizing the spread of COVID-19. But ensuring a critical mass of people are vaccinated is essential in bringing an end to the pandemic. According to a recent JAMA article , the share of U.S...
With the United States still grappling with COVID-19, it is clear that achieving a future free of the disease will require recognition of missteps and thoughtful consideration of how to move forward. During the October 13, 2020 session of Washington Post Live’s “America’s Health Future” series, two experts outlined exactly these perspectives. The discussion, entitled “The Impact of COVID-19 on our Health Systems,” was hosted by Washington Post reporter Paige Winfield Cunningham and featured one-on-one conversations with Eric Topol, MD, founder and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute, and Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist. Dr. Topol emphasized...
Two earlier posts in this series explored what is a virus and what is a vaccine as well as the types of vaccines under development. As with the type of vaccine, the type of virus is as important when developing a vaccine. You might ask: Why do we need a new flu shot every year? Why isn’t there a vaccine for HIV? How do these issues translate to the new COVID-19 vaccine? Excellent questions all, that are answered by understanding the differences between viruses. Influenza, the virus which causes the flu, has a genome made of eight independent segments. The eight segments in one strain of the flu can easily mix with the segments in other strains of the flu, creating what is called a “shift”...
Much like drugs, vaccine candidates that seem promising during laboratory research are assessed and validated based on their performance in clinical trials. In the U.S., making it to this step requires a trial sponsor to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to the FDA for review. 6 This application most commonly highlights technical data on immunogenicity — the ability to elicit a targeted immune response —, the mechanism of action from animal testing, and importantly, the resources needed for scaling up production. 6 In a recent vaccine-development-focused installment of the popular American Public Health Association and National Academy of Medicine’s webinar series, COVID-...

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