Women in STEM

During Women’s History Month, there have been ample opportunities to recognize the work of female pioneers in science. Of course, not long ago, the idea of a woman scientist was a rarity rather than an ordinary reality. At the time that Rosalind Franklin helped discover the structure, and therefore the function, of DNA in 1953, women’s contributions were often dismissed, and Franklin herself received only passing acknowledgment in the seminal double helix paper. Sputnik and the Cold War ushered in a new era of scientific zeal, and more women began to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Even so, the entry of women into science-based careers didn’t happen...

Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana