Women's History Month

During Women’s History Month, there have been ample opportunities to recognize the work of female pioneers in science. Of course, not long ago, the idea of a woman scientist was a rarity rather than an ordinary reality. At the time that Rosalind Franklin helped discover the structure, and therefore the function, of DNA in 1953, women’s contributions were often dismissed, and Franklin herself received only passing acknowledgment in the seminal double helix paper. Sputnik and the Cold War ushered in a new era of scientific zeal, and more women began to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Even so, the entry of women into science-based careers didn’t happen...
Dear Research Advocate, Women in Science and Technology : March is Women’s History Month. The impact of COVID-19 on the careers of women in STEMM is the focus of a report to be released by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) on March 9, 2021. How did the COVID-19 pandemic disrupt the careers of women in academic STEMM during 2020 and how might these disruptions—both positive and negative—shape future progress for women in academic STEMM? The public is invited to a discussion with NASEM committee members Eve J. Higginbotham, University of Pennsylvania; Reshma Jagsi, University of Michigan; and Erick C. Jones, University of Texas at Arlington. Register here ...

Sidebar Quote

You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter