At AIDS 2012: Research is Paying Off, but Support Still Necessary

brianhunsicker

The International AIDS Conference has been in town all week, stirring up community excitement, celebrity activism, political commitment and scientific progress for global health, specifically for HIV/AIDS. There is talk of achieving an AIDS-free generation.

’€œWe can’€™t hope to eliminate AIDS in this country or around the world if we just tinker with one little problem or another timidly, at one time, if we let short-term thinking rule the day,’€ Sen. John Kerry (D-MA), chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told a packed room Monday. ’€œSome will claim ’€¦ that in the midst of a global economic crisis we don’€™t have the luxury of leading on this issue, that we ought to scale back PEPFAR, reduce U.S. support for the Global Fund. But what they ignore is that this is precisely the moment when our investment is most needed so that past investments are not lost, and we don’€™t slide backwards.

’€œSo everyone knows that ending AIDS; not going to be easy, not going to be quick, not going to be cheap but we know now that it may be a huge effort or investment, but just like the eradication of smallpox, it’€™s an investment that is absolutely guaranteed to show enormous returns. It is also my friends, an inescapable test of our values as a nation, as human beings.’€

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, also spoke.

’€œNow is not the time to retreat, now is the time to pour it on; money does matter. You have seen the benefit of the money being appropriated at Congress throughout the international community beginning to pay dividends,’€ Graham said. ’€œNow is the time to focus on finding a vaccine like the future of the world depended on it.

’€œPart of what I am trying to do is encourage the international community and my government to have a vision very much like the [Bill & Melinda] Gates Foundation: Turn this into a business problem and solve it. It is a humanitarian exercise for sure; we all benefit when we do good things for those who are in need, but the opportunity to solve this problem exists now greater than ever.

Bill Gates spoke compellingly about the need for new tools and ultimately for a vaccine in order to seriously talk about moving towards the end of AIDS. He said that while we do not have the tools yet, we will get them if we stay the course in terms of research investments.

’€œThe ultimate tool will be a vaccine. Scientists are making great progress, they understand the shape of the virus, how to count the antibodies ’€¦ It is very exciting, and the U.S. government is by far the biggest backer, not only of these treatment things we have been talking about, but also all of these research programs. So, it is phenomenal to see that in that ongoing commitment.

’€œEarlier this year [the Gates Foundation] made a $750 million grant to Global Fund, but equally we support these research activities, so no one should think that we have got the tools yet. We will get these tools but only if we stay the course in terms of the scientific investments.’€

Follow Research!America’€™s presence at AIDS 2012 through our Twitter feed https://twitter.com/ResearchAmerica.

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Without research, there is no hope.
The Honorable Paul G. Rogers