The summer 2019 edition of the Research!America newsletter , The Research Advocate, is now online. In this newsletter, you'll find information about the recent Wellcome Global Monitor report on global attitudes about science, Research!America's recent briefing on patient-centered research on rural heart health, the measles outbreak, and much more.
Dear Research Advocate, “June Gloom” is what the residents of Los Angeles call this past month’s weather. I was in California last week at the invitation of UC Riverside, which has, in addition to a robust portfolio of federally funded research, an inspiring commitment to the community. For the record, it wasn’t gloomy in Riverside, but then, the LA area is vast, and the overcast is closer to the ocean. There is a decent parallel here to the vastness of the landscape for support of research in Washington: the House passed two “minibus” appropriations packages this month that include significant increases for federal agencies that support research. This week we issued a statement about the...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, was treating patients with HIV/AIDS before the disease had a name. In the early 1980’s, a period he describes as the dark years of his professional career, half of the patients he saw would be dead within twelve months, and the medical community had no idea what was killing them. At the Washington Post Live event Transformers:Health on June 11, Dr. Fauci described the progress that has been made in HIV treatment, as well as the challenges that must still be addressed to tackle the disease in the United States and globally, in a discussion entitled “Chasing a cure: the global outlook on HIV/AIDS” ...
Dear Research Advocate, Later today, I will participate on a panel at Aspen Ideas: Health to explore the implications of an ambitious new survey commissioned by the Wellcome Trust. The report , which was released yesterday in Washington, explores public attitudes on trust in science, gathered in a survey conducted in 140 countries. Overall, trust in science is linked strongly to education and income and also tracks with trust in governments and the military. The survey takes a deep dive on attitudes toward vaccines, with findings that appear to closely track our U.S. findings from last year. The findings in the report will help us better understand how individuals, both in the U.S. and...
Dear Research Advocate, The House is working to reach its goal of passing all twelve FY20 appropriations bills by the end of June, debating a “minibus” package of four of those bills this week, including the Labor, HHS, and Education funding bill that includes funding for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Next week, a second “minibus” package of appropriations bills will be on the House Floor, including funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (As time goes on without a budget cap resolution, it remains critical to do your part to assure a...
As Research!America staff developed questions for our 2019 national public opinion survey, we reflected on the incredible progress in health and research in the 30 years since the organization was founded . We wanted to know: what did the American people think? Most Important Medical Achievements of the Last 30 Years What would you say was the single most important medical achievement of the past 30 years? (Choose one) Source: A Research!America poll of U.S. adults conducted in partnership with Zogby Analytics in January 2019 The list of options was carefully curated based on other published lists of medical breakthroughs, public health achievements, and retrospective articles looking back...
Since Research!America was founded 30 years ago, a key strategy in advocating for medical and health research has been public opinion. As President Abraham Lincoln said, “…public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed.” In this blog post series, we’ll highlight the findings of our 2019 national public opinion survey on medical, health, and scientific research, and explore the trends in the data where we can. U.S. Global Standing in Science and Innovation in 2050 Of significance, 62% do not have confidence that America's global preeminence will strengthen - they either responded with Statement B, neither or not sure. Research!America'...
Research!America member FASEB (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) kicked off their NSF Matters campaign with a briefing highlighting NSF-funded research tackling antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotic-resistant infections, driven by overuse of antibiotics in clinical and agricultural settings, are on the rise, began the briefing’s first panelist, Dr. Paul Turner , Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University . His work focuses on a new, non-antibiotic approach to treating bacterial infections: viruses. Bacteriophages (simply referred to as phages) are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. The phage Turner works with attacks bacteria via their...
Dear Research Advocate, In a recent weekly letter, I mentioned that advocacy in support of fetal tissue research continued to be critical, despite the apparent lull in an Administration effort to evaluate how to curtail/replace this avenue of research. Apparent is the operative word. Yesterday, the Administration announced that an NIH fetal tissue research-related contract with UCSF will not be renewed; intramural researchers at NIH will no longer be able to procure fetal tissue for research; and another layer of review will be imposed on all those seeking federal funding for fetal tissue research. Read our statement , an Axios article, and, most importantly, contact Eric Anthony ( eanthony...
“The richest Americans live an average of 15 years longer than the poorest Americans,” said Martine Powers of the Washington Post as she kicked off a Washington Post Live forum on “The Future of Health” on June 4, 2019. The panel discussion focused on correlations between income and health featuring Dr. Georges Benjamin , president of the American Public Health Association and Research!America board member, and Dr. Shiriki Kumanyika of Drexel University . “We have to go upstream and look at how we got here,” to understand the implications of social factors and health disparities, Dr. Kumanyika explained. For example, regarding the homeless population, she suggested, “Why do we have policies...

Sidebar Quote

Without continued support for health research, many of the most promising young scientists, their ideas and a myriad of potentially life-changing scientific breakthroughs will vanish into oblivion.
Paul Marinec, PhD; University of California San Francisco