Dear Research Advocate, Super Tuesday is just days away. While media is largely focused on the Presidential candidates, candidates for Congress will also be selected. As we head into the general election, Research!America will be launching a non-partisan initiative to inform all candidates about where voters stand on medical and scientific research. Earlier this month, we released data from our January survey demonstrating widespread, bipartisan support for more research funding to address the many critical health issues facing Americans today. More poll data from our January survey will be online shortly; watch for it, and put it to use! We all think it’s important that candidates know...
As Research!America prepares for our 24th Advocacy Awards Dinner , we want readers to learn more about our award recipients. We are continuing our Tuesday series leading up to the March 11 event. Please meet Michael M.E. Johns, MD, recipient of the Herbert Pardes Family Award for National Leadership in Advocacy for Research. Michael M.E. Johns, MD Professor, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Emory University When did you know you were an advocate for scientific research and innovation? I first sensed the excitement of research in medical school working in my mentor’s lab and continued to pursue research as a faculty member. My first full understanding of the importance of advocacy...
Dear Research Advocate, Partnering with the National Disease Research Interchange (NDRI), Research!America commissioned a survey released this week finding that not only do Americans strongly support organ and tissue donation for research, they believe it is important to encourage more people to donate for both medical and research purposes. Respondents admire those who donate for research as well as for transplant. We may be at an important inflection point with more research made possible because more people will donate. Speaking of surveys, the AAAS Annual Meeting last week was jam-packed with programs about how the public trusts (or mostly trusts) science and appreciates scientific...
As Research!America prepares for our 24th Advocacy Awards Dinner , we want readers to learn more about our award recipients. We are continuing our Tuesday series leading up to the March 11 event. Please meet Cyndi Zagieboylo, representing the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, recipient of the 2020 Paul G. Rogers Distinguished Organization Advocacy Award. Cyndi Zagieboylo President and CEO, National Multiple Sclerosis Society When did you know you were an advocate for scientific research and innovation? When I started my work at the National MS Society in 1985, the importance of research was immediately clear. With no disease-modifying therapies and a dearth of physicians who wanted to...
Dear Research Advocate, The President released his proposed budget for FY21 earlier this week, kicking off the federal budget season. The President’s budget is a statement of priorities, even if it has no force of law (it’s the Congress that is charged in the Constitution with the ‘power of the purse’), and it rightly gets considerable attention. We think it’s deeply damaging for our nation that a higher priority isn’t being placed on science. Among the counterproductive proposals in the budget is a more than 7% cut to NIH and a double-digit cut to the CDC. Our colleague Jenny was quoted in Bloomberg Government as noting that, as underscored by the coronavirus outbreak, “the most important...
As Research!America prepares for our 24th Advocacy Awards Dinner , we want readers to learn more about our award recipients. We are continuing our Tuesday series leading up to the March 11 event. Please meet Dr. Bruce Alberts, recipient of the 2020 John Edward Porter Legacy Award, generously supported by Ann Lurie. Bruce M. Alberts, PhD Chancellor's Leadership Chair in Biochemistry and Biophysics for Science and Education, University of California, San Francisco When did you know you were an advocate for scientific research and innovation? I think that, like a great many others in my generation, I was first inspired to pursue science as a teenager by reading The Microbe Hunters by Paul de...
Dear Research Advocate, We were pleased to hear President Trump, in his State of the Union address (SOTU) earlier this week, highlight the importance of progress against health threats. Specifically he referenced mental health challenges, Alzheimer’s disease, kidney disease, HIV/AIDS, the opioid epidemic, childhood cancer, and the current coronavirus outbreak. What we didn’t hear, unfortunately, is that the President will grow federal funding for research. Nor did we hear him speak of plans to assure U.S. leadership in the global R&D arena, giving it the priority merited by its strategic significance. The President’s references during the SOTU to dramatically lowering prescription drug...
As Research!America prepares for our 24th Advocacy Awards Dinner , we want readers to learn more about our award recipients. We are continuing our Tuesday series leading up to the March 11 event. Please meet Dr. Paul Offit, co-recipient of the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Builders of Science Award. Paul A.Offit MD Professor of Pediatrics, Children's' Hospital of Philadelphia When did you know you were an advocate for scientific research and innovation? I chose to go into pediatrics because of my love of children. The reason for that passion was that I was in a polio ward when I was five years old in the mid-1950s. It was at a time when there was only one visiting hour a week with maybe a...

Sidebar Quote

Without continued support for health research, many of the most promising young scientists, their ideas and a myriad of potentially life-changing scientific breakthroughs will vanish into oblivion.
Paul Marinec, PhD; University of California San Francisco