Public Health Thank You Day, November 25


580491_520295697990810_1202890633_nAs recent disease outbreaks have demonstrated, the need for public health is around the clock. But sequestration, across-the-board spending cuts, presents major challenges for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other federal health agencies.  Among them: depleted resources for immunizations, reduced support to state and local health departments, and deep cuts to programs to prevent cancer, heart attacks, strokes, and diabetes. In spite of the challenges, public health professionals continue to dedicate their time and energy to addressing major health threats.

CDC employees are among the many public health professionals who show tireless commitment to preventing disease and promoting good health. Health educators instruct children on the long-term effects of lifestyle choices; researchers pursue new treatments for evolving illnesses; regulators ensure prescription drug safety and effectiveness; physicians implement vaccination programs. They are public health heroes, working every day to improve others’€™ quality of life.

On Public Health Thank You Day, Research!America and other leading health organizations take time to recognize the public health professionals who protect us. You can too! Please join us in honoring their outstanding work. There are many ways to get involved: connect with us on Facebook (and use #PHTD on Twitter), write to your policymakers, submit a letter to the editor to your local paper, send a thank you e-mail, and much more.

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If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana