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Research!America is dedicated to ensuring a strong public and private sector investment in research to improve health at a level warranted by scientific opportunity and supported by public opinion. Member organizations and others share their perspectives on a wide variety of topics relating to public and private sector research and innovation, and public health. The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of Research!America.

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Research!America member Biotechnology Industry Organization, BIO , is amplifying our call to Make Medical Research a National Priority during the Memorial Day congressional recess. The role of biomedical and health research in driving private sector innovation cannot be understated. The BIOtechNOW blog has posted a guest entry from Research!America president and CEO Mary Woolley on this very topic and the on-going social media campaign. Visit the blog to read the full message and then join us on Twitter and Facebook to speak up for federal support of medical innovation.
We’€™ve heard plenty in the media about sequestration’€™s impact to federal agencies including furloughs and short-lived’€”delays at airports, but how is the biomedical research community dealing with the across-the-board cuts? The word ’€œfurlough’€ is something you would never hear in a research lab; time-sensitive research experiments cannot simply be put on hold. So how will the shortfall in budgets be met? Many researchers and universities are making tough decisions that could delay promising studies and result in layoffs. Below are resources with more details about sequestration’€™s impact to science and the economy. Research!America’€™s sequestration fact sheet . There are many more...
Now, more than ever, young scientists are grappling with important career decisions. For newly minted PhDs, there are fewer and fewer academic faculty positions available. These coveted ’€œtenure track’€ positions have been the ’€œtypical’€ career path for research scientists in a variety of biomedical fields. Yet in an environment with flat funded research budgets combined with sequestration, a decade of cuts, more scientists are pursuing ’€˜alternative’€™ careers. This desire to learn about the diversity of career options for scientists prompted nearly 1,400 graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and other scientists-in-training to register for the recent Career Symposium hosted by the...
Dear Research Advocate: I invite you to join me in speaking out during the Memorial Day congressional recess (May 27-31) as part of a social media campaign using the hashtag #curesnotcuts. Our goal is to continue to position research and innovation to improve health where it belongs: as a fundamental national priority that Americans can count on because their elected representatives rank it so highly. In our social media campaign, each day of the recess has a specific theme that can be customized with your information and patient/researcher stories. We have made it easy to get involved: click here to see sample social media messages, a list of selected congressional offices and their...
The U.S. House Appropriations committee approved a spending bill for FY14 that slashes the Labor, Education, Health and Human Services bill to its lowest since 1998 when adjusted for inflation. The bill makes deep cuts for medical research and other domestic programs. The proposed funding is 18.6 percent below 2013 funding levels under sequestration, 22.2 percent below the original appropriations for FY13. These cuts will jeopardize medical innovation and programs that protect Americans’€™ health. How low is the suggested appropriations amount? In terms of absolute dollars, it is less than the FY01 funding level. If the 18.6% cut are applied across the board to each program, this proposed...
During the Memorial Day Congressional recess, Research!America invites all research stakeholders to join us in sending a strong message to Congress to Make Medical Research a National Priority . We’€™ll focus on a different theme for Facebook and Twitter messaging each day to show the wide ranging impact of biomedical and health research on our lives and communities. Follow us on Twitter @ResearchAmerica and use the hashtag #curesnotcuts to join in the national conversation. We will also be posting updates on our Facebook page and encourage you to engage your representatives on Facebook as well. On Memorial Day Monday, we’€™ll remind Congress about the role of medical research in addressing...
Reblogged from The CPH Foundation In honor of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’€™s new 2013 Operating Plan , The CPH Foundation is proposing this new ’€œIn the RED’€ Logo for the CDC! What a striking change from blue! Sure – it stinks to be stuck in line at the airport because sequestration caused some flight delays (and thank you Congress for your rapid and bipartisan efforts to reverse those embarrassing news stories!) but wow – imagine the implications from cuts to nearly every disease control and prevention program at the CDC (or don’€™t, if you like your sleep)!! Unfortunately you won’€™t hear much about CDC cuts. Unlike TV and Radio interviews of angry airline...
The United Kingdom recently announced a plan that will capitalize on its role as President of the G8 to promote an international cooperation to stop dementia. This announcement sparks the beginning of increased international collaboration among world governments, industry and non-governmental organizations. Representatives of these diverse entities will gather at an upcoming dementia summit in London, scheduled for September. The global impact of dementia and Alzheimer’€™s is undeniable’€”over 35.6 million people worldwide battle with dementia. With the aging global population, this figure is predicted to exceed 110 million people by 2050. George Vradenburg, chairman of USAgainstAlzheimer...
Dear Research Advocate, “2013 is a bad year to have a good idea,” was the bleak statement Laura Niedernhofer, MD, PhD, made about the impact of sequestration in a recent FASEB report . None of us want this year, or this country, to be a bad starting point for good ideas ’€¦ but that’s what’s at stake. Think about telling someone with a serious illness that this isn’t a good year, or a good decade, for research. Think about telling them that from here on out, it may always be a bad year for a good idea. Is there hope for turning this around? We have bipartisan support and we have champions; that we need more is a reality, but by no means an impossibility. Cancer research advocates gathered...
Photo © OHSU A group of scientists at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) ’€” a Research!America member ’€” recently announced that it had successfully generated cloned embryonic stem cells from skin cells of an adult and an unfertilized human egg. Like other stem cell technologies, these cloned stem cells may one day be used for therapeutic purposes ’€” replacing failed organs or damaged nerves. Research into this area had been ongoing for several years; until now, scientists’€™ efforts were unsuccessful. The technique used by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, PhD, and colleagues is one called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In the past, scientists have failed to drive these hybrid...

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You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter