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Research!America is dedicated to ensuring a strong public and private sector investment in research to improve health at a level warranted by scientific opportunity and supported by public opinion. Member organizations and others share their perspectives on a wide variety of topics relating to public and private sector research and innovation, and public health. The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of Research!America.

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The Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’€™s Initiative has announced its second online innovation challenge, which seeks to identify differences in early cognitive decline between genders. Winning submissions will share $100,000 in prize awards. This new initiative ’€” called the 2013 Geoffrey Beene Global NeuroDiscovery Challenge ’€” was announced Monday at the Society for Women’€™s Health Research Gala in Washington, DC. ’€œNot unlike cancer, the Geoffrey Beene Foundation’€™s lead philanthropic cause, most researchers agree that the greatest potential to stop Alzheimer’€™s lies in the earliest stages of the disease, which is why we fund translational research. Innovative Challenges help...
With so much national attention focused on the impact of sequestration on air travel, one might think there was no other area of the federal budget feeling the pain of these across the board cuts. Today, National Public Radio’€™s Marketplace shed more light on the less obvious but devastating cuts that are affecting biomedical and health research and the careers of scientists. You can listen to the segment , featuring Research!America’€™s President and CEO, Mary Woolley, and R!A communications intern Megan Kane, who recently received her PhD in human genetics but has difficulty finding a post-doc position in a lab due to the funding cuts. Do you have something to contribute to the national...
By Robert Weiner and Patricia Berg, PhD You can’€™t sequester cancer. You can only hurt the research to treat and prevent the diseases, and stop the treatments themselves. That is the message of 18,000 scientists gathered for the American Association for Cancer Research’€™s annual convention in Washington. A rally for medical research with those thousands of scientists ’€” usually wonky researchers poring over their microscopes ’€” was held on the grounds of the Carnegie Library across from the Washington Convention Center. In rhythm to drumbeats, the scientists became political advocates as they chanted after each speaker, ’€œMore progress! More hope! More life!’€ Cancer is neither...
On April 24 th , representatives from members of the Coalition for Health Funding gathered on Capitol Hill to visit with Members of Congress. As a member of CHF, Research!America participated in these informational visits with offices of freshman Congressmen and Senators. The theme of the day was ’€œhealth is everywhere,’€ and advocates sought to communicate the important role of health and research in the lives of Americans and in our economy. During the meetings, advocates spoke about how adequate funding for agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and others can help address soaring...
April 25 is World Malaria Day , and this year’€™s theme is ’€œInvest in the Future: Defeat Malaria.’€ More than half of the world’€™s population is at risk for malaria, a potentially fatal disease that is transmitted through mosquitoes. Strong investments in malaria research and programming have helped reduce global malaria mortality rates by 26% since 2000, and 50 countries are on track to reduce malaria cases by 75% by 2015 . World Malaria Day is an opportunity to celebrate these successes and raise awareness of the investments that are still needed to fight this life-threatening disease. Despite the hard-won progress made against malaria, approximately 660,000 people die from this...
Dear Research Advocate, Media attention to the impact of sequestration-forced furloughs at the FAA, causing airport delays, has put both Congress and the administration on the defensive. Senate Majority Leader Reid has introduced legislation to delay sequestration until a broader deficit reduction solution can be negotiated, and there is a Republican-led effort to prevent the closure of towers and stop the furloughs. It is unclear where these efforts will lead, but there clearly is power in showcasing concrete damage to our citizenry and our economy as a way to illustrate the larger problem: Sequestration isn’€™t just a delayed flight issue, it is huge, strategic mistake for our nation...
On May 15, Research!America and our partners hosted “Neglected Tropical Disease Research in Louisiana: Saving Lives and Creating Jobs,” at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans. ( Read a recap of the event here. ) Research!America produced two short videos in conjunction with the event. The first video is a broad discussion on NTDs and their effect on the Southern U.S. Chagas alone affects 300,000 Americans and has an economic impact of $1 billion, between health care costs and lost productivity. To demonstrate what it’s like to live with Chagas, the second video is the personal story of Maira Gutierrez. She was originally diagnosed with Chagas...
April 20-26 is World Immunization Week. Sponsored by the World Health Organization, World Immunization Week is intended to raise awareness and support for one of the world’€™s most powerful tools for health ’€“ vaccines. Immunization is an extremely successful and cost-effective health intervention, preventing an estimated 2 million to 3 million deaths each year. In addition to saving lives, vaccines save money by avoiding the health care costs and lost productivity that accompany illness. Thanks to the global immunization campaign led by WHO, smallpox was completely eradicated in 1980 ’€“ the first disease so classified. Polio, another vaccine-preventable disease, is close to being...
Large medical centers across the U.S. are investing in a burgeoning area of healthcare for their cancer patients: €œprecision medicine. Substantial investments are being made to not only build new laboratory facilities and purchase research equipment, but also to staff these new facilities. Universities like Weill Cornell Medical College , Harvard Medical School , and Johns Hopkins University are joining clinical centers like Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in building an infrastructure for personalized medicine with the hope of playing a bigger role in the development of new drugs. This approach is building off of years of federal investment in genomics research. First, the Human...
The 2012 State Technology and Science Index from the Milken Institute provides a state-by-state breakdown of technology and science capabilities and how well states have converted those assets into companies and high-paying jobs. Where does your state rank? Massachusetts ranked number one for the past 5 indices’€”released every two years’€”topped by an all-time high score in 2012. Analysts point to a large number of top-tier universities with research programs and cutting-edge science and tech firms as major contributors in Massachusetts. Analysis of this year’€™s report shows that technology and science industries can lead the way in economic recovery. Average scores were higher in the...

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The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient