clinical trials

Excerpt of a blog post by Dr. Tom Insel, Director of the National Institute of Mental Health. (From NIMH blog) The Research!America awards dinner is like a lot of DC galas, complete with members of Congress, celebrities, and speeches to honor those who have contributed to a cause. For Research!America, the cause is biomedical research and this year, as in each of the past 25 years, there were honors bestowed on advocates for cancer and rare diseases. Kathy Giusti, diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 1998, spoke passionately about the lack of research on this blood cancer and her singular fight to create a registry and clinical trials, leading to new treatments that have extended her own life...
Dear Research Advocate: Fostering research and innovation has long been a multi-pronged effort ’€” government, industry, academia, patients and patient organizations, foundations, and individual philanthropists ’€” all working to advance research. The current interest shown by private philanthropists in advancing science is an echo of a phenomenon witnessed a century ago ’€” and a sign of the opportunity available in some way to all of us to accelerate medical progress and maintain our nation’€™s competitive edge. As reported in a recent front page New York Times article, private donors are stepping up in a big way at a time when scientific opportunity has never been greater. But it is...
Excerpt of an article by Research!America VP of Communications Suzanne Ffolkes and Communications Specialist Anna Briseno, published in Elsevier Connect . A panel hosted by Research!America and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network discusses challenges and opportunities for advancing cancer research Julie Fleshman’s journey to improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients was inspired by her father, who died four months after receiving the diagnosis. That was in 1999. Since then, she’s been advocating for research to support early diagnosis and better treatments. “That passion drives me every day ’€“ anger mixed with hope and optimism of the future,” she said. Fleshman , President and CEO...
Dear Research Advocate: What will determine the speed and scope of medical progress in the years to come? There is more to it than the essential ingredients of money and brainpower. Sound tax policy is essential if we are to propel medical progress. Yesterday, Rep. Dave Camp (R-MI-04), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, introduced a comprehensive tax reform bill. While the prospects for passage during this election year are ’€” to put a positive spin on it ’€” uncertain, Congressman Camp laid down the gauntlet for much-needed tax and entitlement reform, and he also proposed making the R&D tax credit permanent. Uncertainty surrounding future access to the R&D tax credit...
Excerpt of an op-ed by David Satcher, MD, PhD, honorary chairman of the African American Network Against Alzheimer’€™s, former U.S. surgeon general and Research!America’s 2007 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Award for Sustained National Leadership award winner, published in The Washington Post . Every February our society measures its progress in the march toward equality as part of Black History Month. But seldom do we discuss inequality in health, an injustice that continues to plague African Americans. A whole host of health disparities remains unaddressed, including Alz­heimer’€™s ’€” a disease that African Americans are two to three times more likely to develop than non-Hispanic whites...
Dear Research Advocate: Like most Americans, we are alarmed by the ongoing government shutdown. Since the shutdown began, I have been in Georgia, Massachusetts and Ohio, speaking to business and academic leaders, state and local elected officials, philanthropic leaders, and working scientists. Everyone is outraged! Clearly, biomedical and health research ’€” already compromised via sequestration ’€” is not the only priority placed at risk by the impasse, but it is a critical one. From limiting access to clinical trials to undermining the ability to protect our food supply or investigate disease outbreaks, Americans are put at unnecessary risk when government employees are furloughed. We...
Dear Research Advocate: Like most Americans, we are alarmed by the ongoing government shutdown. Since the shutdown began, I have been in Georgia, Massachusetts and Ohio, speaking to business and academic leaders, state and local elected officials, philanthropic leaders, and working scientists. Everyone is outraged! Clearly, biomedical and health research ’€” already compromised via sequestration ’€” is not the only priority placed at risk by the impasse, but it is a critical one. From limiting access to clinical trials to undermining the ability to protect our food supply or investigate disease outbreaks, Americans are put at unnecessary risk when government employees are furloughed. We...
Dear Research Advocate: Congress is on the brink of forcing a government shutdown on Tuesday, October 1. The implications of a shutdown are being subsumed by coverage of the political theater taking place. That is an injustice to Americans, who will be affected. History is illustrative on this point. During the 1995 and 1996 shutdowns , the NIH turned away new patients at the Clinical Center. Research studies housed at federal institutions ceased for the duration of the shutdown; researchers and leaders of industry, academia as well as in government agencies were unable to plan effectively, wasting time and money; the CDC was forced to stop disease surveillance programs, leaving us...
Dear Research Advocate: Congress is on the brink of forcing a government shutdown on Tuesday, October 1. The implications of a shutdown are being subsumed by coverage of the political theater taking place. That is an injustice to Americans, who will be affected. History is illustrative on this point. During the 1995 and 1996 shutdowns , the NIH turned away new patients at the Clinical Center. Research studies housed at federal institutions ceased for the duration of the shutdown; researchers and leaders of industry, academia as well as in government agencies were unable to plan effectively, wasting time and money; the CDC was forced to stop disease surveillance programs, leaving us...
Clinical research is key to saving lives, lowering health care costs and reducing waste and inefficiencies in our health care system. To highlight the latest insights from prominent health and research leaders, The Association of Clinical Research Organization has launched a new video series about the importance of clinical research. In the latest installment, John Lewis, Vice President of Public Affairs interviews Research!America president and CEO, Mary Woolley about what’€™s next for research, the public perception of clinical trials and how we should encourage more minority participation in clinical trials. According to a recent Research!America poll , altruism is a strong motivating...

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If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana