medical research

Imagine a world in which researchers can accurately measure a person’s risk of developing a wide range of diseases and then provide them with individualized methods of prevention, treatment and care. That world is what the National Institutes of Health (NIH)’s All of Us Research Program is striving to create. All of Us seeks to enroll one million or more volunteers whose biological samples, along with lifestyle and health information, will be analyzed to give researchers better insights into the biological, environmental and behavioral factors that lead to disease. “So much of what we’ve done in medicine over the years has not really taken into account individual differences,” said Dr...
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the “crown jewel of federal spending,” said Dr. Keith Yamamoto at a Capitol Hill briefing sponsored by the Coalition for the Life Sciences and the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus on July 14 titled, NIH 101: An Introduction to the National Institutes of Health. Yamamoto, vice chancellor for research at the University of California, San Francisco and Research!America board member, was the featured speaker at the event, sponsored by the Coalition for Life Sciences and the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus. He discussed the mission and budget of the NIH, as well as the rigorous scientific review process that ensures the budget achieves...
A new report prepared by leading scientists, thought leaders and policy experts, A Vision and Pathway for NIH , includes recommendations for the new Administration to further advance the nation’s leading biomedical research and health agency-- the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal is to better align agency organization and policies with present and future strategies for achieving the highest impact in research and training, and improving health outcomes. The report, written by an ad hoc working group, led by Research!America board member Keith Yamamoto, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor for Science Policy and Strategy; Director, UCSF Precision Medicine; Vice Dean for Research, School of...
Dear Research Advocate: A very close election has entered the history books, in the process laying bare the profound divisions that will challenge all our elected representatives as they seek to unify and heal the nation. We have been deluged with questions about the impact of a Trump Administration on science. A useful primer is his answers to the ScienceDebate.org questionnaire that we and several other groups worked together to create. For example, President-elect Trump says this: “...the federal government should encourage innovation in the areas of space exploration and investment in research and development across the broad landscape of academia.” He also says this: “Though there are...
With the Presidential race narrowing and congressional races heating up, issues surrounding the health of Americans will likely come to the forefront. Scientists committed to reducing the burden of disease and finding cures are speaking up and urging all candidates to share their plans to advance medical progress. Public policies in support of medical innovation are increasingly important to address health threats that claim millions of lives and disrupt our economy. If elected, will candidates ensure increased funding for medical research is among their top priorities? Will they remove barriers to private sector innovation? As part of our national voter education initiative, Campaign for...
This article appeared in the March/April edition of Ohio Matters, the official publication of the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. As Ohio’s leading sector, the biomedical industry plays an important role in the state’s economy, and the resources to support the research being done by colleges, universities and industries to advance societal health must continue to expand. From protecting us against mosquito-borne pathogens such as the Zika virus or food-borne pathogens such as E. coli O26, Salmonella and Listeria, we constantly need new methods of detection, prevention and treatment, all of which are made possible by the research conducted by dedicated biomedical scientists, research that costs...
Dear Research Advocate: At Research!America’s annual meeting yesterday Alex Silver, co-founder and CEO of the Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Partnership (EBRP), a member of Research!America, made a strong case for venture philanthropy as a common-sense approach to investing in research, particularly as it applies to rare diseases. He challenged us to think in new ways about nonprofit organizations, ways that reinforce both partnership and innovation. Patients like his 7-year-old son Jackson, for whom every day is a painful challenge, are waiting. (For more on spending on research as an investment vs. spending for consumption, see Norm Augustine’s timely essay .) Also at the annual meeting,...
Dear Research Advocate: What’s the “right” amount of taxpayer funding for medical and health research? What are the ‘right’ policies for science? We are asked these question regularly. The announcement yesterday by Harold Varmus that he will leave the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the end of this month reminded me that in Science in 1993, Dr. Varmus and fellow Nobel Laureate Michael Bishop, along with their then-colleague at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Mark Kirchner, set forth an 11-point prescription for science policy. It is worth re-reading their approach to a set of problems that bear a striking similarity to those we face today, e.g: “The last decade has...
Letter to the editor by Research!America VP of Communications Suzanne Ffolkes published in The Gainesville Sun . In reference to the Dec. 28 editorial ’€œ Funding innovation ,’€ countless medical breakthroughs would not have been possible without the support of federal funding. It is imperative that research and innovation become a higher national priority for the new Congress. Bipartisan proposals to advance medical progress ’€” like the 21st Century Cures Initiative that includes provisions to boost federal funding for research, modernize clinical trials and incentivize the development of new drugs and devices, among others ’€” should be given serious consideration. Stagnant funding over...
Dear Research Advocate: As America rings in the New Year, many of us will be reflecting on the past and making resolutions for the future. To get a feel for the numerous ways in which NIH, CDC, AHRQ, NSF and FDA contributed to the well-being of Americans and others throughout the world in 2014, click here . I hope lawmakers are taking time now to establish New Year’€™s resolutions and set priorities for the new Congress, which convenes one week from today. My biggest wish for the new Congress? Pragmatism over politics. If pragmatism rules, the next Congress will shake off the stultifying complacency that is weighing our nation down and act to reignite U.S. innovation. More here . One reason...

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Sidebar Quote

The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient