medical research

By Bart Peterson, JD, senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Lilly I recently had a wonderful opportunity to address the National Health Research Forum, hosted by Research!America. As you may know, this important forum brings together leaders from the public and private sectors to discuss pressing matters that affect the future of research and development in our country. As I mentioned in my speech, from 2000-2007 I had the honor of serving as the mayor of Indianapolis. Although Indianapolis has a solid economic base, I often wondered how other cities in my home state would fare in the headwinds of diverse economic challenges. Indiana is dotted with cities of fewer...
By Robert J. Hariri, MD, PhD, Chairman, Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Celgene Cellular Therapeutics . Medical innovation is the source of dramatic improvements in the quality and length of life and also creates enormous value for society and the economy at large. For example, in 1900, the average U.S. life expectancy was 49 years. Today, it is 79. It is estimated by 2040, U.S. life expectancy will reach 85 years. This is primarily the result of innovation in medicine and improvements to public health. New medical treatments accounted for 45 percent of the increase in U.S. life expectancy between 1960 and 1997 and for nearly three-quarters of the increase in U.S life expectancy in...
By Bart Peterson, JD, senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Lilly I recently had a wonderful opportunity to address the National Health Research Forum, hosted by Research!America. As you may know, this important forum brings together leaders from the public and private sectors to discuss pressing matters that affect the future of research and development in our country. As I mentioned in my speech, from 2000-2007 I had the honor of serving as the mayor of Indianapolis. Although Indianapolis has a solid economic base, I often wondered how other cities in my home state would fare in the headwinds of diverse economic challenges. Indiana is dotted with cities of fewer...
Recent polling commissioned by Research!America shows nearly half of the American public does not believe we are making enough progress in medical research in the U.S.; the government shutdown proves them right. The shutdown shows where the real deficit is: in the failure of elected officials to take action to fund American priorities. The deficit seems to be a deficit of common sense! It’s inconceivable that our nation’s research ecosystem, the catalyst for addressing current and emerging health threats, is being hamstrung by the inability of our elected officials to reach a budget agreement and end indiscriminate, across-the-board budget cuts. The research pipeline has already been deeply...
Recent polling commissioned by Research!America shows nearly half of the American public does not believe we are making enough progress in medical research in the U.S.; the government shutdown proves them right. The shutdown shows where the real deficit is: in the failure of elected officials to take action to fund American priorities. The deficit seems to be a deficit of common sense! It’s inconceivable that our nation’s research ecosystem, the catalyst for addressing current and emerging health threats, is being hamstrung by the inability of our elected officials to reach a budget agreement and end indiscriminate, across-the-board budget cuts. The research pipeline has already been deeply...
Excerpt of an article by Ariana Eunjung Cha, published in the The Washington Post . A year ago, Yuntao Wu was on a roll. The George Mason University researcher had just published a study hailed by the scientific press as ’€œgroundbreaking’€ that reveals why HIV targets only a specific kind of T-cell and, separately, found that a compound in soybeans seemed to have promise for inhibiting infection. These days, Wu ’€” one of thousands of scientists who lost his grant in the wake of sequester cuts ’€” says he spends much of his time hunched over a desk asking various people and organizations for money. The deep across-the-board cuts in government spending that took effect March 1 have sent...
Excerpt of an article by Ariana Eunjung Cha, published in the The Washington Post . A year ago, Yuntao Wu was on a roll. The George Mason University researcher had just published a study hailed by the scientific press as ’€œgroundbreaking’€ that reveals why HIV targets only a specific kind of T-cell and, separately, found that a compound in soybeans seemed to have promise for inhibiting infection. These days, Wu ’€” one of thousands of scientists who lost his grant in the wake of sequester cuts ’€” says he spends much of his time hunched over a desk asking various people and organizations for money. The deep across-the-board cuts in government spending that took effect March 1 have sent...
Advocacy Academy participants: Mesias Pedroza, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine; Chloe N. Poston, PhD, Eli Lilly and Company; Jeffery G. Mellott, PhD Northeast Ohio Medical University Last week, we held our inaugural Advocacy Academy, bringing 12 postdoctoral researchers from across the U.S. to Washington, D.C. A two-day advocacy training program that culminated in Congressional visits with the participants’€™ representatives. We selected this group of motivated and concerned early-career scientists from a diversity of institutions, including Northeast Ohio Medical University, UCSF, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania School of...
Dear Research Advocate: With only eleven days until the end of the fiscal year, Congress has yet to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to fund the government past September 30. The House is expected to vote on, and pass, a bill that does not include funding to administer Obamacare as part of their “CR;” the Senate and the President will not agree, thus almost certainly forcing a government shutdown. The issue of what to do about sequestration is almost certainly not going to be resolved as part of negotiating this short-term CR. That means we must continue to fight for action, and there has been a flurry of advocacy on Capitol Hill. This included, but was certainly not limited to the...
Advocacy Academy participants: Mesias Pedroza, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine; Chloe N. Poston, PhD, Eli Lilly and Company; Jeffery G. Mellott, PhD Northeast Ohio Medical University Last week, we held our inaugural Advocacy Academy, bringing 12 postdoctoral researchers from across the U.S. to Washington, D.C. A two-day advocacy training program that culminated in Congressional visits with the participants’€™ representatives. We selected this group of motivated and concerned early-career scientists from a diversity of institutions, including Northeast Ohio Medical University, UCSF, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania School of...

Pages

Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana