NIH

Karen Goraleski By ASTMH Executive Director Karen A. Goraleski The American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene is an international organization comprised of scientists, clinicians and program professionals who work to promote global health through the prevention and control of infectious diseases. ASTMH recognizes that global health is America’€™s health and America’€™s health is global health. It is vitally important for the broad research community ’€“ from basic through implementation and evaluation ’€“ to actively support a vibrant and innovative research enterprise. Everyone benefits from a strong U.S. investment in research. U.S. budget challenges threaten to derail the...
In 2012, months before sequestration was enacted, scientists were already pressed to find jobs. Take the example of ’€œRebecca,’€ whose story was featured in a recent Huffington Post article. She had completed her PhD in chemistry and was working in an academic research laboratory. When her lab didn’€™t get a new grant to allow her to continue the research, she ended up unemployed. In an already tough financial environment, she spent three months looking for employment in research, hoping to utilize her hard-earned doctoral degree. In the end, she rewrote her resume, removing any mention of her doctoral degree and quickly found employment with an auto parts company, working as a secretary...
Adipose- derived stem cells. Source: Pendleton, Li, et. al. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue vs Bone Marrow:In Vitro Comparison of Their Tropism towards Gliomas. 2013. PLOSONE. Recent research from Johns Hopkins Medicine that received government support shows that stem cells isolated from a patient’€™s own fat may be able to deliver new treatments directly into the brain to fight an aggressive brain tumor. The work, done in the laboratory of Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, MD, is a proof-of-principle study that tests the ability of a particular type of stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells, to locate damaged or cancerous cells. Cancer cells, particularly those in glioblastomas, the...
Dear Research Advocate, House of Representatives Science Committee Chair Lamar Smith’€™s (R-TX) proposed legislation, the “ High Quality Research Act ,” would undermine, rather than achieve, “high quality” in research, since it would create several new hoops for approval of NSF-funded grants. These appear to be based on the mistaken idea that science follows a linear path to a single metric for success or failure. And the bill requires the NSF director to attest in advance to the success of each funded proposal! Letters penned by former NSF directors and National Science Board chairs and former NSF assistant directors warn of the “chilling and detrimental impact” this legislation could have...
Recently, a group of scientists, clinicians and patients gathered in a suburb of Washington, DC to discuss scientific progress in the study of a rare premature aging disorder. This disease, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome’€”often referred to as HGPS or simply progeria’€”is one you may not have heard of, yet. But the Progeria Research Foundation and families of progeria patients have been working hard to increase awareness and raise funds for research into this rare disease that results in death at an average age of only 13. Among the list of speakers at the conference was the Director of the National Institutes of Health, Francis Collins, MD, PhD and researchers from a number of...
Dear Research Advocate, President Obama spoke to the National Academies of Science on Monday. I commend his remarks to you. He charged the members of the Academy, and by extension the science community writ large, to engage at ’€œthe center and the heart of our public debate.’€ He said that IF scientists do so, the nation will be assured of continued prominence. IF is a tall order — it makes most scientists very uncomfortable, but it is essential that we get out of our comfort zone right now. The president didn’€™t pound his fist on the podium in stressing this, so I will. The science community simply cannot step away from the public and political fray right now; not if we want to see the...
By Robert Weiner and Patricia Berg, PhD You can’€™t sequester cancer. You can only hurt the research to treat and prevent the diseases, and stop the treatments themselves. That is the message of 18,000 scientists gathered for the American Association for Cancer Research’€™s annual convention in Washington. A rally for medical research with those thousands of scientists ’€” usually wonky researchers poring over their microscopes ’€” was held on the grounds of the Carnegie Library across from the Washington Convention Center. In rhythm to drumbeats, the scientists became political advocates as they chanted after each speaker, ’€œMore progress! More hope! More life!’€ Cancer is neither...
On April 24 th , representatives from members of the Coalition for Health Funding gathered on Capitol Hill to visit with Members of Congress. As a member of CHF, Research!America participated in these informational visits with offices of freshman Congressmen and Senators. The theme of the day was ’€œhealth is everywhere,’€ and advocates sought to communicate the important role of health and research in the lives of Americans and in our economy. During the meetings, advocates spoke about how adequate funding for agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and others can help address soaring...
Dear Research Advocate, Senators Casey (D-PA) and Burr (R-NC), recently honored with our Whitehead Award for Research Advocacy, have joined forces again with a bipartisan letter calling for a strong commitment to NIH funding in FY 14. Please take a moment now to urge your senators to sign on to this letter. And say thank you to Senators Burr and Casey for being champions for research! In past letters, I’€™ve written about attempts by Congress to micromanage and in some cases, attack critical components of our nation’€™s research portfolio. The social sciences have been targeted time and time again despite the immense value of these programs and the return on investment they represent. In...
Karen Elkins, PhD By Karen Elkins, PhD, a biomedical scientist and science writer currently working in the field of microbiology and immunology. How does the physiology of the human body respond to severe injuries and septic shock? Funded by NIH, over 50 researchers have been working on a decade-long set of large projects to analyze human tissues taken directly from seriously ill patients. The goal of this ambitious effort is to understand the body-wide inflammation that accompanies major injuries like trauma with blood loss, major burns, and septic shock from invasive bacterial infections. In a recent study from this program, researchers analyzed a series of blood samples obtained from...

Pages

Sidebar Quote

Luck shouldn't play a role in why I'm alive.
Laurie MacCaskill, a seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor