Public Health Thank You Day

President Obama’s decree proclaiming April 4 – 10 National Public Health Week focuses on several key objective: stemming the tide of infectious disease like Zika; improving access to healthcare domestically and globally; promoting healthy behaviors in adolescents; preventing opioid and illicit drug abuse; decreasing gun violence; addressing climate change-related health issues; and improving access to mental health resources. National Public Health week is an opportunity to reflect on the pivotal role public health research and practice play in advancing the wellbeing of Americans and populations across the globe, and recognize the individuals, organizations and agencies that carry out...
Dear Research Advocate, I hope you’ll pardon this weekly message arriving a few days early. This week gives each American a special opportunity to reflect on all that makes us grateful. I am thankful for each of you who places an emphasis on incorporating advocacy for research, public health, and medical progress into your daily lives. I am also especially thankful for all those who took time yesterday to celebrate Public Health Thank You Day . The conversation was robust on social and traditional media with messages honoring public health professionals and expressing gratitude for the multi-faceted benefits of public health research and practice. More than 800 organizations and individuals...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday November 23, 2015. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit http://www.publichealththankyouday.org (link is external) for more information. In the United States, injuries kill more people between the ages of 1 and 44 than any other disease. To put this in perspective, each day 480 people die from injuries, one person every 3 minutes. This is the equivalent of a Boeing 777 crashing each day. Of course not everyone who is injured dies. Millions of people are hospitalized or treated in emergency departments. All of this...
As flu season approaches Families Fighting Flu is working to make sure children don’t die needlessly. Influenza (the flu) is a serious disease. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized for influenza each year in the United States and 20,000 – 30,000 people die. During the 2014 – 2015 flu season alone, 146 children died from this highly contagious disease but preventable disease. As Executive Director of Families Fighting Flu (FFF), I am all-too-familiar with these statistics. Families Fighting Flu was founded in 2004 by families who lost a child to influenza; their heartbreaking stories are shared on our website . Now a trusted source of information and resources, FFF’s mission is to save...
Leading up to Public Health Thank You Day (PHTYD), there is no accomplishment more worthy to celebrate than community water fluoridation . Optimal water fluoridation is a safe and cost-effective intervention, reducing oral health disparities and preventing tooth decay by 25% over a lifetime. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers community water fluoridation as one of the ten greatest public health achievements of the 20 th century. September marked the 70 th anniversary of community water fluoridation and its longstanding public health benefits. To commemorate this seminal anniversary, Representative Mike Simpson, D.M.D. (R-ID) introduced H.Res.416 , a resolution...
While the annual flu vaccine saves thousands of lives every year , most people don’t give much thought to the work that takes place behind the scenes to determine what’s in that injection. The US has a system for national influenza surveillance which collects data from across the US to identify which influenza viruses are circulating, if the current season’s vaccine is a good match, and which viruses should be included in the next year’s vaccine. Preparations for next season’s flu vaccine start at the beginning of each flu season. In fact, it is the specimens collected at the beginning of each new flu season that help inform vaccine virus selection for the next year. Public health...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday November 23, 2015. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit http://www.publichealththankyouday.org (link is external) for more information. Dr. Carrie Bearden, clinical neuroscientist at UCLA seeks to understand the underlying biology of mood disorders in teens The rate of mood disorders nearly doubles when children enter adolescence. Dr. Carrie Bearden, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Psychology at UCLA, seeks to understand why. She uses interdisciplinary approaches to examine the role of circadian...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday November 23, 2015. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit http://www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. Psychologist Dr. Mary Ellen Weissman discusses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of learning disorders in children to the public health All parents want their children to reach their potential and experience success within the home, school and community. But what happens when a child fails to thrive in one or more of these areas and a mental health issue is suspected? While estimates vary...
In honor of Public Health Thank You Day we will be highlighting public health professionals throughout the day today. Our first professional is Sasha McGee, Ph.D., M.P.H., epidemic intelligence service officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, assigned to the District of Columbia Department of Health. What drew you to a career in public health? My earliest educational and research experiences were guided by my passion to pursue a career in which my work would contribute to the improvement of health. After completing my doctoral training, I knew that I did not just want to conduct research but to participate in the translation of data into interventions that would benefit...
In honor of Public Health Thank You Day we will be highlighting public health professionals throughout the day. Our second professional today is Andrew Hennenfent, D.V.M., M.P.H., a CDC/CSTE applied epidemiology fellow at the District of Columbia Department of Health. What drew you to a career in public health? After being accepted to veterinary school during my senior year of college, I attended a presentation given by the director of the DVM/MPH joint degree program at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine which centered on the critical role that veterinarians play in public health. During the presentation, the speaker described the unique perspective veterinarians...

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Sidebar Quote

Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed.
Abraham Lincoln