research funding

A century of basic scientific research on retroviruses was required for the current advances in cancer and HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and gene therapy to be achieved. Furthermore, our understanding of normal cell growth, human development, genetics, and evolution would be immensely impoverished if it were not for scientists pursuing their curiosity about peculiar animal viruses for over 100 years. Finally, numerous valuable technologies and commercial products have emerged from studies investigating how retroviruses are transmitted. The viruses that are now known as the avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses were discovered in 1908 and 1911. It was remarkable that birds could get...
For athletes and spectators who are attending the Olympic Games this month, the threat of deadly antibiotic resistant bacteria is all too real. Recently the “bad bug” carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia (KPC) was discovered in the waters off several beaches of Rio, where rowing, canoeing and swimming events are scheduled to occur. KPC is one example of antibiotic resistant bacteria, which already sicken at least two million Americans every year. If people visiting Rio for the Olympics become infected with KPC, they may bring it back home, quickly spreading this dangerous bacterium around the world. Without support for new antibiotic R&D, such as the 21 st Century Cures Act,...
Dear Research Advocate: Research!America yesterday released our recommendations for the top five science priorities the new Congress should address in its first 100 days: end sequestration, increase funding for our nation’€™s research agencies, advance the 21st Century Cures Initiative legislation, repeal the medical device tax, and enact a permanent and enhanced R&D tax credit. See the full press release here . Among these priorities, ending sequestration is the steepest uphill climb – but what a difference it would make for the future of health and the nation’s economy! That’€™s the focus of this editable message to members of Congress. Please weigh in! Securing meaningful increases...
Excerpt of an op-ed by Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley published in the Huffington Post . As the new Congress sets priorities, there are strong indications that the political climate is ripe for a surge in science. Bipartisan support for the 21st Century Cures Initiative, a comprehensive study of roadblocks to medical innovation and development of new disease therapies and treatments, is slated to move forward with draft legislation early next year. The measure is expected to address six areas of reform: integrating patients’ perspectives into the regulatory process, modernizing clinical trials, fostering the future of science, investing in advancing research, incentivizing...
Dear Research Advocate: The 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the clarion call for equality for all Americans brings to mind the work still to be done to address health disparities. For example, cancer incidence and death rates are significantly higher for African-Americans than for all other ethnic groups, and Hispanic and African-American adults are 1.5 to 2 times more likely to have diabetes than white adults. Our polling shows that nearly 75% of Americans believe it is imperative to conduct research to understand and combat health disparities. As a community of advocates, we need to press policy makers to keep this unacceptable gap in health care and health outcomes in...
Dear Research Advocate: The 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the clarion call for equality for all Americans brings to mind the work still to be done to address health disparities. For example, cancer incidence and death rates are significantly higher for African-Americans than for all other ethnic groups, and Hispanic and African-American adults are 1.5 to 2 times more likely to have diabetes than white adults. Our polling shows that nearly 75% of Americans believe it is imperative to conduct research to understand and combat health disparities. As a community of advocates, we need to press policy makers to keep this unacceptable gap in health care and health outcomes in...
Excerpt of an article published by The Salt Lake Tribune on sequestration’€™s impact to research institutions in Utah. Paul Fraughton | The Salt Lake Tribune Carl Thummel was about $200,000 short. The University of Utah professor of human genetics had already won the money, about one-third of his lab’€™s annual budget, from the National Institutes of Health. It was due to begin paying out in December ’€” just as the country went off the so-called fiscal cliff. More than six months later, the money still hadn’€™t come, the victim of federal budget cuts known as sequestration. So he cut his own salary by 25 percent, as well as his technicians’€™ pay. “They’€™re putting their salaries on the...
Excerpt of an article published by The Salt Lake Tribune on sequestration’€™s impact to research institutions in Utah. Paul Fraughton | The Salt Lake Tribune Carl Thummel was about $200,000 short. The University of Utah professor of human genetics had already won the money, about one-third of his lab’€™s annual budget, from the National Institutes of Health. It was due to begin paying out in December ’€” just as the country went off the so-called fiscal cliff. More than six months later, the money still hadn’€™t come, the victim of federal budget cuts known as sequestration. So he cut his own salary by 25 percent, as well as his technicians’€™ pay. “They’€™re putting their salaries on the...
By William (Bill) R. Brinkley, Ph.D., TAMEST’€™s 2012 President Sometimes you find luck sitting by your side at the most opportune of moments. For example, what would you do if you suddenly found yourself seated next to a key member of the U.S. Congress on a two and a half hour flight to Washington, D.C.? Be prepared, it could happen to you! If you are a frequent traveler like me, you probably prefer to read, daydream or sleep on most flights. But what would you do if you suddenly recognized that your seat mate was a VIP’€”say, a key member of the U.S. Senate or House of Representatives? You might recognize it as a terrific opportunity to put in a good word for particular issues of great...
By William (Bill) R. Brinkley, Ph.D., TAMEST’€™s 2012 President Sometimes you find luck sitting by your side at the most opportune of moments. For example, what would you do if you suddenly found yourself seated next to a key member of the U.S. Congress on a two and a half hour flight to Washington, D.C.? Be prepared, it could happen to you! If you are a frequent traveler like me, you probably prefer to read, daydream or sleep on most flights. But what would you do if you suddenly recognized that your seat mate was a VIP’€”say, a key member of the U.S. Senate or House of Representatives? You might recognize it as a terrific opportunity to put in a good word for particular issues of great...

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If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana