global health

Dear Research Advocate: We saw the power of a robust public health force, integrated public health programs, and an innovative R&D pipeline this week as the World Health Organization declared the recent Ebola outbreak contained . Think of the lives and dollars that could be saved if global health were accorded the priority it deserves on a sustained basis, rather than gaining traction only when crises are upon us! We have updated our Top Ten Reasons to invest in global R&D. Use this terrific Kaiser Family Foundation primer on all things global health policy-related, and make the case for global health research as a strategic asset on social media or with your congressional...
Flu pandemics and other disease outbreaks underscore the need for vaccines and public health infrastructures to protect individuals against global health threats, said leaders representing government, scientific societies and advocacy groups at a briefing hosted by Research!America and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. on May 21. The program coincided with the opening of the Smithsonian’s exhibit Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World. Seventy-percent of Americans say the federal government should do more to educate the public about global disease outbreaks and the risk to the U.S., according to a new national survey commissioned by Research!...
On behalf of the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University, I am proud to join nurses from across the country in celebrating National Nurses Week 2018. With over 10,000 of our BSN, MSN, PhD and DNP graduates serving throughout the workforce, the education and expertise we provide prepares the next generation of nurses and patient care advocates across the country. This week is a time to not only reflect on the education we provide future generations of nurses, but to celebrate the accomplishments of those nurses who have dedicated their lives to the service of others. At the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, we are fortunate to have nursing faculty whose...
A tsunami of cancer threatens livelihoods across the globe, and the world is largely unprepared for its impact. The disease accounts for one out of every seven deaths worldwide – more than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined . Nearly 60% of the world’s cancer cases occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and these regions account for about 65% of the world’s cancer deaths . Reducing these disparities requires comprehensive and complementary approaches, and engaging with partners. The American Cancer Society’s global cancer control team has – through in-country research and collaborative partnerships – developed responsive and sustainable initiatives around cancer...
Research!America’s webinars in 2017 tackled a variety of timely health and policy issues, such as the nation’s opioid crisis which accounts for six out of 10 drug overdose deaths, the vital role of federally supported global health research, and the importance of effective communication in educating the public and lawmakers about the far-reaching benefits of public and private sector research. Scientists, students, advocates, influencers, decision-makers and media participated in the webinars, which provided relevant and detailed information to raise awareness and inform advocacy initiatives. On December 4, Research!America and the Society for Neuroscience hosted the webinar “Leveraging...
World AIDS day is observed on December 1 every year to help raise awareness, commemorate those who have died from the virus, and encourage advocates and policymakers to increase their efforts in fighting the epidemic and supporting those whose lives have been impacted by it. This year, the World AIDS day theme is “Increasing Impact through Transparency, Accountability, and Partnerships.” Although the U.S. government is at the forefront of tackling the HIV/AIDS epidemic, its success depends on partnerships with other governments, the private sector, philanthropic organizations, multilateral institutions, and patient advocates. As a result of these strong partnerships, 19.5 million people...
Terrifying news accounts of recent deaths from Ebola, flesh-eating bacteria, HIV/AIDS, Zika and even the plague can give the misleading impression that we are at greater risk than ever. But we are fortunate to live in a time when—thanks to scientific advances that have produced lifesaving vaccines and treatments—we can actually begin to imagine a disease-free world. It’s appropriate for us on Public Health Thank You Day (PHTYD) to acknowledge the commitment of scientists around the globe who work tirelessly, often under difficult and dangerous circumstances, to solve the world’s most pressing health problems. As we have all been reminded, diseases know no borders so it’s important that we...
Public health offers the greatest return on investment to improve both health and environmental outcomes. It is the common platform that will enable us to tackle the existential challenge of our time: how we can live sustainably on our planet as we add another 2 billion people to the world’s population by 2050. This is an urgent challenge given that we already utilize more resources on a yearly basis than our planet’s ecosystems can provide. This global population increase will primarily occur in urban settings in developing countries that already have a fractured or fragile infrastructure. This is a precarious mix that lends itself to instability, poor health and worsening environmental...
Dear Research Advocate, It has been a week of reminders about severe health threats facing our nation. At a screening of excerpts from Janet Tobias’ forthcoming film Unseen Enemy , a panel of infectious disease and economic experts sounded the alarm about how devastating the next pandemic could be. The film reminds us that it is not if , but when a pandemic will strike, potentially taking tens of millions of lives around the globe. Juxtapose that reality with this: 1) we are severely underinvesting in the public private partnerships essential to defeating infectious disease worldwide; 2) our nation has no standing fund for rapid response to deadly global health threats; 3) a CDC initiative...
Dear Research Advocate, The news is concerning. President Trump’s proposed FY18 budget , released on Tuesday, fails to embrace national priorities including research and innovation that directly impact health, economic prosperity and national security. Steep cuts for federal research and health agencies run counter to American values and public expectations that research be put to work at the level of scientific opportunity, in order to advance health and quality of life and to drive the economy. The president’s proposed budget cuts $1.7 trillion over 10 years, almost all of it from non-defense discretionary programs. The FY18 budget proposes cuts of $7.2 billion or 21% for NIH; $1.2...

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If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana