Blog

Research!America is dedicated to ensuring a strong public and private sector investment in research to improve health at a level warranted by scientific opportunity and supported by public opinion. Member organizations and others share their perspectives on a wide variety of topics relating to public and private sector research and innovation, and public health. The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of Research!America.

Recent Blog Posts

Dear Research Advocate, Budget Watch: President Biden is expected to release his first set of spending requests for FY22 on Friday, enabling Congress to begin consideration of the budget for the new fiscal year. The document won’t include the infrastructure and jobs plan the President unveiled last week (read our statement on the plan here ) though Biden officials say the proposals are intended to be complimentary. What will we be looking for in the FY22 budget proposal? Strong funding for NIH, CDC, FDA, NSF, AHRQ, and other key agencies and programs in the science, technology, and public health arenas. We can advocate now - use this editable email to reach out to your members of Congress...
This week, communities across the country are celebrating National Public Health Week (NPHW) led by the American Public Health Association (APHA). This annual observance recognizes the invaluable work of public health professionals in keeping our communities healthy and safe. As we lift up the contributions of our public health officials, we are also reminded of the importance of continuing to improve existing health systems and rebuild where there are shortcomings. This year, the NPHW theme, “Building Bridges to Better Health,” invites everyone to join in support of public health at a time when widespread recognition is greatly needed. The COVID-19 pandemic has both illuminated and...
Dear Research Advocate, Biden Administration Plan: The Biden Administration has released “ The American Jobs Plan .” The plan encompasses major investments in R&D, transportation, broadband, clean drinking water, manufacturing, and several other areas. It calls for $180 billion for “R&D and the technologies of the future.” The NSF would receive $50 billion, a portion of which would be for the creation of a technology directorate. The proposal also calls for $30 billion to improve our nation’s pandemic preparedness, including a buildout for BARDA. Research!America issued a statement on the plan. Endless Frontier: The NSF technology directorate included in The American Jobs Plan is...
On March 26, a national day to speak out against AAPI hate, Research!America stands strongly with the Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community to #StopAsianHate. Racism and violence have no place in our society. This is, once again, a time for us all to recommit to community. It’s also a time for listening and reflecting. See the resources below from Carnegie Mellon, University of Pittsburgh, and San Francisco State for ways to get involved. Resources Collaboratory Against Hate - Research and Action Center - Led by Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh the center will bring together the collective expertise to better understand and combat hatred based on...
During Women’s History Month, there have been ample opportunities to recognize the work of female pioneers in science. Of course, not long ago, the idea of a woman scientist was a rarity rather than an ordinary reality. At the time that Rosalind Franklin helped discover the structure, and therefore the function, of DNA in 1953, women’s contributions were often dismissed, and Franklin herself received only passing acknowledgment in the seminal double helix paper. Sputnik and the Cold War ushered in a new era of scientific zeal, and more women began to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Even so, the entry of women into science-based careers didn’t happen...
Dear Research Advocate, Advocacy Then and Now: This letter marks #500 since I began this weekly conversation with you. In the first letter, I spoke out against the Budget Control Act and the severe funding caps it would (and did) impose on strategic imperatives like research. You joined with us to help secure modifications to those budget caps to enable funding increases for NIH and other research agencies. Advocacy works. Now, hundreds of letters later, the FY22 budget cycle is about to begin: reports are that President Biden will release the first details of his FY22 budget request next week, to be followed by a more detailed budget later this spring. It was heartening to hear the...
*This piece reflects the opinions of the author. For just over a year now, an invisible, deadly enemy has wreaked havoc around the world. Declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March of 2020, COVID-19 has killed millions, devastated communities, and ravaged the economy. This microscopic enemy, in the form of a virus, has infected nearly 29 million people in the U.S. and claimed the lives of over 520,000 Americans — a number that surpasses combat fatalities in the Vietnam War. As this piece is being written, the U.S. leads the globe in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths. Given the alarming mortality rate and markedly high plateau in COVID-19 infections (50,...
Dear Research Advocate, The Senate HELP Committee and House Energy and Commerce Committee held hearings this week to review the Biden Administration’s pandemic response and ongoing COVID-19 vaccine distribution with CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, NIH NIAID Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, HHS Chief Scientific Officer for the COVID Response Dr. David Kessler, and FDA CBER Director Dr. Peter Marks. In their testimonies, the Administration officials underscored how utilizing past scientific discoveries in combination with new partnerships led to the development of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics at a record pace. They also spoke to concerns regarding equitable vaccine distribution, and how...
Dear Research Advocate, Never Again: One year ago today, the WHO officially declared COVID-19 a pandemic. Within days, statewide stay-at-home orders began across the U.S., and the road before us became frighteningly uncertain. Across the country, COVID-19 has taken almost 530,000 lives; globally, more than 2.6 million have died. Over the course of a year filled with determination, turmoil, and tragedy, the significance of science and technology became crystal clear. Because of decades of basic research, rapid response science & technology (S&T), and heroic public health efforts by individuals laser-focused on saving lives, we have three safe and effective vaccines, and, as new CDC...
Previously, Research!America published a blog post on the science behind mRNA vaccines . With the approval of a third COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S., this one using a different vaccine technology, this blog post will share the science of adenovirus vector vaccines . How does the J&J vaccine work? Is it similar to the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines? The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is an “adenovirus vector” vaccine. Similar to the mRNA vaccines from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna, this type of vaccine uses a snippet of genetic material to elicit an immune response, but it uses a different delivery method. Adenovirus vector vaccines use modified cold viruses to deliver genetic material...

Pages

Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor